2005: PGA Tour - For Heintz, another year in minors

It was an all-too-familiar position for Bob Heintz. After 108 holes played over six days, the Yale grad sat next to the scoring trailer and tried to calculate his odds. Heintz had just finished the tournament at 10 under par; the cutoff for the top 30 and ties for a PGA Tour card was hovering between 10 and 11 under.

“You feel like stabbing yourself in the gut,” said Heintz, 35, who had finished right on the number at second stage two weeks earlier. “The harder you grab for it, the more you screw up.”

This time around, Heintz wasn’t as fortunate as he had been at second stage. As the late groups finished, there were few train wrecks and the magic number drifted to 11 under. Job security on the Nationwide Tour next season was little consolation. Heintz isn’t looking forward to another year in golf’s minors.

“We all want to pretend there’s not that much of a difference between tours (Nationwide and PGA Tour), but I look at it as a 10 times difference,” Heintz said. “It’s a matter of playing for $4 million or $500,000.”

The Heintz family knows the difference between majors and minors. This fall, Chris Heintz, Bob’s younger brother, was promoted to baseball’s Minnesota Twins after 10 seasons in the minor leagues, and he now is on the Twins’ 40-man roster.

“I would say we’ve paralleled each other a little bit, except that I’ve had a couple of stints in the big leagues,” said Bob Heintz. “The problem with his career is that it’s subjective. I can shoot my scores – if I shoot 4 under every day, nobody is going to take my card away from me. He could hit .300 every year, and if somebody doesn’t think he has potential or has the right tools, he’ll never get moved up.”

In the end for Bob Heintz, his numbers just didn’t add up.

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