Beau Hossler will skip senior season at Texas to turn pro

Beau Hossler, the reigning Haskins Award winner, will skip his senior season at Texas to turn pro.

Beau Hossler will skip senior season at Texas to turn pro

Professional

Beau Hossler will skip senior season at Texas to turn pro

Texas’ Beau Hossler announced Thursday on his Instagram that he will skip his senior season to join the pro ranks. Hossler’s post read in part:

After months of weighing options and discussing with my loved ones, I have decided to turn professional and forgo my Senior year at The University of Texas. I have been preparing to become a professional golfer, and have dreamed of this day for more than ten years. I am blessed to have surrounded myself with some of the greatest people in the world. Without each one of their contributions, I would not be in this position today.

Hossler’s decision comes a little more than a month after the Longhorns’ top golfer suffered a torn labrum in his left shoulder during the semifinals of the NCAA Championship. The injury required surgery. His recovery period is expected to last four months.

That initially threatened to change Hossler’s plans. The Longhorns player was expected to turn pro after the NCAAs and had a sponsor exemption at the John Deere Classic lined up.

Although Hossler will remain out of action until the fall, he has gone forward with his plans to turn pro.

After months of weighing options and discussing with my loved ones, I have decided to turn professional and forgo my Senior year at The University of Texas. I have been preparing to become a professional golfer, and have dreamed of this day for more than ten years. I am blessed to have surrounded myself with some of the greatest people in the world. Without each one of their contributions, I would not be in this position today. My instructor, Jim Flick, who passed just a few years ago, provided me with the sturdiest of golf foundations, and his words still stick in my head on a daily basis today. My current instructor, Adam Porzak, has spent countless hours and sleepless nights trying to help me to be the best I can be. Dr. Jay Brunza has helped to shape my mental game into my greatest strength. Dr. Joseph Zappala and Coach Ryan Steenberg have provided me with an understanding of where my body has been, is now, and will be in the future. Santa Margarita Catholic High School provided a perfect stepping stone for my college career that would unfold at Texas. If I told you about all my experiences at Texas, it would take about a month. My teammates during these three years are some of the most special golfers I’ve seen, but more importantly, they are some of the highest character people I’ve been around. Their playing records speak for themselves as golfers, but the most impressive parts are those that you don’t see on paper. Thank you guys for pushing me day in and day out. You are the most competitive and gutsy group I have had the pleasure of being around. Coach Fields has been an incredible asset in my life the past three and a half years, since I stepped on campus. He has treated me and my teammates like his own sons, and cares about our careers at and after Texas as if they were his own. Coach Fields, thank you for giving me the opportunity to come to UT. Coaches Jean Paul Hebert and Ryan Murphy, thank you for being there for me and pushing me. Dr. Randa Ryan, Kat Hastings, Dr. Allen Hardin, Gabe Perlaza, and Trey Zepeda, thank you for keeping my mind straight in the classroom and my body prepared for competition.

A photo posted by Beau Hossler (@the_beau_show_) on Jul 7, 2016 at 3:14pm PDT

Hossler, the winner of the 2016 Fred Haskins Award presented by Stifel, finished his junior season as Golfweek‘s No. 2-ranked player after having won five tournaments – the third-most in a season at Texas, behind Longhorns legend Ben Crenshaw’s seven in 1973 and six in 1972 – and two-runner up finishes. He finished the season with a 69.73 stroke average. He shot 29 of his 37 rounds at or under par and carded 18 rounds in the 60s, including two 64s, two 65s and three 67s.

His injury, though, forced him on the mend at the end. With some late Hossler heroics, Texas advanced to the NCAA Championship final. But Hossler, unable to play because of the shoulder injury, had to withdraw before his final match and forfeit the point. Oregon would win the match, 3-2, to capture the school’s first national title.

Hossler, who first came to fame as a 17-year-old who led during the second round of the 2012 U.S. Open, finishes his career at Texas with six college victories and three All-America honors. During that period, he also captured the prestigious Western Amateur (2014) and Jones Cup Invitational (2016) and played on the 2015 U.S. Walker Cup team.

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