Titleist 917D2 and 917D3 Drivers

Titleist 917D2 driver

Titleist 917D2 and 917D3 Drivers

Equipment

Titleist 917D2 and 917D3 Drivers

The seeding process for Titleist’s newest drivers, the 917D2 and 917D3, began at Congressional Country Club in the days leading up to the Quicken Loans National in June. One by one, Titleist staff players tried the drivers and compared them to their current drivers, mostly from the 915D2 and 915D3 lines. Several pros switched that week.

Titleist announced Thursday morning that amateurs soon can try out the 917 drivers, which reach stores Oct. 21.

The 917 drivers feature the same 16-position SureFit adjustable hosel found on the 915 models, which allows players to adjust the loft and lie angle independently.

Most notably, the 917 drivers include a SureFit CG adjustable weight system in the sole. Each 917 will ship with an evenly balanced, 12-gram weight cartridge in the head. The cartridge is shaped like an AA battery. That weight sets the driver in a neutral setting. Also included is a 12-gram draw/fade weight that can replace the neutral weight to shift the center of gravity and give players left-and-right adjustability.

“The SureFit hosel, with its independent lie adjustment, allows players to impact the start direction of the golf ball coming off the face,” said Stephanie Luttrell, Titleist’s director of metalwood development. “If you are a player that pulls the ball left of the target line, you can flatten out your lie angle, and that will allow you to start the ball more on your intended target line. SureFit CG impacts left-and-right dispersion by dynamic face closure as well as side spin. It’s more about shot shape and curvature than starting direction.”

Golfers who work with an authorized custom-fitter who determines that another neutral weight (8, 10, 14 or 16 grams) is better suited for the player will get that weight factory-installed and will receive a draw/fade cartridge of that weight as well.

The SureFit CG system was asymmetrically positioned in the head to help produce more desirable ball flights.

“A fade is generally a higher-spin ball flight,” Luttrell said. “We have angled the SureFit CG in the sole to allow that fade position to be slightly more forward, so it will produce a lower-spin fade. In contrast to that, a draw is typically a lower-spin ball flight, so we’ve positioned that center of gravity slightly farther back, which adds a little spin to that draw. So, between all three positions (fade, neutral, draw), we’re moderating and delivering more consistent spin.”

Titleist also updated the Active Recoil Channel in the sole. The channel is designed to allow the face to flex more efficiently at impact. It looks similar to the channel in the 915 drivers, but it now flexes more because its walls are thinner in non-stress areas.

Titleist also tweaked the variable-thickness face. The center of the hitting area is still thicker than the edges, but instead of gradually tapering, the outer portions have a constant thickness. Luttrell said this enlarges the sweetspot and pulls it over a bigger part of the face.

Titleist also was able to keep the moment of inertia level achieved by the 915 drivers, so on off-center hits the club will resist twisting and work to transfer energy from the swing into the shot.

The 917D2 has a 460cc head and produces slightly more spin than the 440cc 917D3. The 917D3 will create a little flatter shot because it creates about 250 rpm less spin.

Greg Chalmers (917D2, 8.5 degrees) won the Barracuda Championship to become the first PGA Tour champion using a 917 driver. Jimmy Walker switched into the 917D2 before the British Open and won the PGA Championship with it.

The Titleist 917D2 and 917D3 will be available with five stock shaft options, including the new Aldila Rogue Max, Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana Limited White and Fujikura Speeder Pro for $499. The 917D2 will come in 8.5, 9.5, 10.5 and 12 degrees, and the 917D3 will come in 8.5, 9.5 and 10.5 degrees.

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