Golfer plays 1,250-mile hole in 20,093 shots across Mongolia

Golfer Courtesy: The Telegraph/Andrew King

Golfer plays 1,250-mile hole in 20,093 shots across Mongolia

Golf

Golfer plays 1,250-mile hole in 20,093 shots across Mongolia

Rory McIlroy may be Northern Ireland’s best golfer, but he is not that nation’s most daring player.

Adam Rolston wins that honor. Rolston completed the wildest – if not the longest – golf hole in history Saturday when he dropped a 7-foot putt on the 18th green of the Mt Bogd Golf Club in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

Rolston’s golfing journey – detailed by The Telegraph and set for verification by Guinness – covered 80 days and 20,093 shots. He was playing at a self-determined par 14,000. There is no creature in ornithological history – back to the link between birds and their dinosaurs ancestors – to describe a hole 6,093 over par.

Rolston, a 28-year old former Hong Kong rugby player, lost hundreds of balls over the 1,250 mile (2,011km) golf expedition, playing through water, ice and across deserts.

 “My mates have all been saying you can’t do this and that has been on repeat in my head,” Rutland told The Telegraph. “This has been the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life. I’m in awe of the fact we’ve done it.”

Rolston was raising money for Laureus, which runs children’s sports charities worldwide. He has done this sort of thing for charity in the past. He once rode a bicycle though every country in Africa. Rolston said he chose Mongolia for his golf challenges because of the country’s wide-open, flat and sparsely populated terrain.

Rolston teed off from the western point of Mongolia and worked his way toward the 18th green of the country’s lone golf course.

“We have had dozens of people telling us we were mad or crazy, with comments ranging from: ‘That’s impossible” to ‘Do you not have anything better to do?’” says Rolston.

Among the modes of transport: a golf cart that quickly broke down, a  Russian jeep, a camel and three horses.

And that was all in the first week.

Rolston has not lost his love for the game, either.

“I definitely want to keep playing when I get back,” he told The Telegraph. “I’ve been super-pumped about playing golf every day. I might hit fewer balls when I get back, but I will still be addicted to the game as much as I ever have been.”

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