Callaway Rogue, Rogue Pro, Rogue X irons

Callaway Rogue iron family Callaway Golf

Callaway Rogue, Rogue Pro, Rogue X irons

Equipment

Callaway Rogue, Rogue Pro, Rogue X irons

Club: Callaway Rogue, Rogue Pro, Rogue X irons
Price: Rogue is $899.99 for steel shafts or $999.99 for graphite; Rogue Pro is $999.99 in steel; Rogue X is $899.99 in steel or $999.99 graphite
Specs: Cast stainless steel with tungsten insert and internal urethane microspheres
Available: Feb. 9

Goal
Thanks to a new cup-face design and the use of a new material inside each head, the Callaway Rogue iron family is designed to deliver more distance with enhanced feel and sound.

The Scoop
The new iron family replaces the XR Steelhead irons in the company’s lineup. Callaway says the new faces deliver more distance than an updated XR style could have provided.

“We have been very successful creating more ball speed throughout the range of lofts in an iron set using face-cup technology,” said Alan Hocknell, Callaway’s senior vice president of research and development. “We make an iron in two pieces, with one side being the body and hosel and the other is the face cup. The face cup allows us control of the thickness of the face and the radius of the edge of the face on the topline and the sole. By controlling that thickness more exactly and using techniques like laser welding to put these clubs together, we can really control how high the COR (coefficient of restitution, or springiness) is and push it up to the limit of the rules.”

With the Rogue irons, Callaway’s face has a different thickness pattern that Hocknell says is more energetic, resulting in more ball speed, especially on mis-hits low in the face.

Callaway Rogue iron family

Inside all the Rogue irons are thousands of urethane microspheres that absorb vibration but allow the face to flex at impact. (Callaway Golf)

Thin-faced irons such as the Rogue can create excessive vibrations along with loud, tinny sounds at impact. To enhance the sound and feel of the Rogue irons without impeding the face deflection that boosts distance, Callaway filled the empty chamber between the cup face and the chassis with urethane microspheres.

“We are effectively filling the lower-half of the cavity with a material that is basically a soft urethane,” Hocknell said. “It’s softer than the material that is used to cover our golf balls. But we’ve made that material porous by filling it with thousands and thousands of microscopic glass spheres.”

Callaway Rogue iron

Callaway Rogue iron (David Dusek/Golfweek)

Hocknell said that by putting the urethane inside the glass spheres, it allows the face to flex at impact and generate ball speed. Unwanted vibrations are soaked up, shortening the duration of the sound, lowering its pitch and its loudness.

To lower the center of gravity and make it easier to hit shots higher, Callaway added tungsten weights to the body of the Rogue irons. Each weight is metal injection molded (MIM) to fit in the head of a specific club.

Callaway Rogue Pro irons

Callaway Rogue Pro irons (David Dusek/Golfweek)

The Rogue Pro irons have the same features found in the standard Rogue irons, but they are packed into a more compact head that has a slightly shorter blade length and less offset, along with a narrower sole and thinner topline.

For golfers who unapologetically want to hit the ball farther, Callaway also offers the Rogue X irons.

Callaway Rogue X irons

Callaway Rogue X irons (David Dusek/Golfweek)

Based on the Epic Star irons that started in Japan and came to the United States last summer, Rogue X irons are lighter, longer and their lofts are strengthened compared to the standard Rogue. This version also has a wider sole and larger head, which allowed engineers to drive down the center of gravity to help create a higher launch angle. While the lofts of the Rogue X are stronger than the lofts of the standard Rogue irons, and the 4-6 iron come longer than standard length, the Rogue X produces nearly identical trajectories as the standard Rogue.

“Essentially, it allows us to take loft away without losing launch angle,” Hocknell said. “We can do it in a lighter configuration. Each Rogue X is about 10 grams lighter through the set.”

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