Tony Romo to play PGA Tour event in Dominican Republic

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Tony Romo to play PGA Tour event in Dominican Republic

PGA Tour

Tony Romo to play PGA Tour event in Dominican Republic

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. – Tony Romo is competing in the amateur portion of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am this week. Next month, he will tee it up on the PGA Tour in an official capacity.

Romo, the 37-year-old former Dallas Cowboys quarterback and current lead NFL analyst for CBS, has received a sponsor exemption to play in the inaugural Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship on March 22-25 in the Dominican Republic. He will compete as an amateur.

“Just as an athlete I think you always want to play and compete and obviously I have a passion for golf and I’ve been doing it at different tournaments throughout my life,” Romo said Wednesday at Pebble Beach, “and I just think it’s an honor to be presented with that opportunity and get a chance to play with some of the best players in the world and get to test your game and see what you got.”

Romo is the latest professional athlete from another sport to compete in a pro golf event. NBA star Stephen Curry played in last year’s Ellie Mae Classic on the Web.com Tour and missed the cut.

As of now, Romo isn’t anticipating any other exemptions, but would be open to more.

“Who wouldn’t want an exemption into plenty of incredible Tour events?” Romo said. “If I play well, I think that obviously allows you to have opportunities that can come your way. It’s like a free agent in football, you get one shot; hopefully, you do well.”

Romo, who retired from football in 2016 because of injuries, carries a +0.3 handicap and plays out of Dallas National Golf Club. He’s tried to qualify for the U.S. Open three times, advancing to sectionals in 2010 before having to withdraw because of his football commitments. He also was runner-up in the American Century Championship three straight times (2009-11). Last year, Romo missed the cut at the Western Amateur.

“I was playing some very bad golf for me last spring and summer and I was just getting started back up in the game and some of those tournaments really helped me because it kind of showed me I really didn’t have a direction,” Romo said. “If you’re really going to do it you got to believe in something. … I feel like some of the tournaments this summer when I wasn’t putting scores that I was used to in the past, I really felt like I needed just to start over.”

Romo has committed to practicing more, getting into a routine and working on fundamentals in search of a consistent swing and short game. He plays often with Jordan Spieth back home in Dallas – learning “through osmosis,” as Romo calls it.

“I’ll badger him with questions throughout his entire round and then make him wait for me as we hit three more balls to get it right,” Romo said. “So his longest rounds are definitely when he plays with me because I make him sit out there all day.”

Spieth said Romo has recently been “playing really well,” especially on and around the greens.

“He’s walking in putts from 15 feet at home just, I mean, walking them in almost every hole,” Spieth said. “It’s really impressive. We’ll see if he walks them in out here. It’s harder to walk them in on Poa annua. But yeah, I mean he’s a guy that when he gets kind of a feeling, he sees a couple shots, I mean he believes it like this. And then he can hit a hundred of them in a row. His muscle memory, his hand-eye coordination is really special.

“So I have no doubt he’ll shoot under par every round out here from where they’re playing from. … I mean, he thinks he can win this golf tournament if he played it with us.”

Now, Romo will get the chance.

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