Haas climbs rankings with two wins in 2010

Bill Haas

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The McGladrey Classic

Sea Island, GA - Seaside Course

11:57:15 AM ET. 10/25/2014




PosNameTodayThruScore
T1Andrew Svoboda-11-9
T1Russell HenleyE -9
T3Will MacKenzie-11-8
T3Brendon de JongeE -8
T3Brian HarmanE -8
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Our annual number-crunching package looks at players who made significant moves – up or down – during the past year in the Golfweek/Sagarin Performance Index.

Ranking/movement: 49 (+106)

Why the rise? Not to fall back on one of the oldest clichés in pro golf, but you can’t assess Haas’ 2010 season without reminding yourself that winning indeed does take care of everything. Truthfully, what separates 2010 from Haas’ other four years on Tour was simple – he finally won. And not just once, but twice.

Number crunching

Check back to Golfweek.com every day through the end of the year to take a look at players who made significant moves – up and down – in 2010.

At 28, the breakthrough was a relief, though the former Wake Forest standout definitely isn’t taking it for granted because he appreciates how difficult it is to win. (All he has to do is ask his father, Jay, who has made more cuts than anyone in PGA Tour history, 592, but won only nine times.)

The impressive paychecks – $900,000 for the Bob Hope Classic; $648,000 for the Viking Classic – are why the younger Haas made huge strides on the money list (he was 20th, after having never been better than 61st) and for the first time enters a season assured of spots in the Masters and U.S. Open. Certainly, Haas’ ascension in earnings can’t be credited with dramatic improvements in any one category. His ranking in driving distance (22nd to 42nd), driving accuracy (110th to 88th), greens in regulation (34th to 21st), putts per round (98th to 107th), scoring average (53rd to 26th), and all-around (13th to 19th) were pretty consistent from 2009 to 2010, but where he made significant gains were money and the hard-to-quantify confidence factor.

Haas says: “Obviously, we all set our sights high (to make) the Ryder Cup, (be) No. 1 in the world, and all that, but if you consistently finish top 30 on the money list out here, you’re doing something really good, so I’m extremely pleased with my year.”

– Jim McCabe

• • •

Lucas Glover

Ranking/movement: 109 (-79)

Why the fall? Short game and confidence. Glover went from 97th (58.09 percent) in scrambling (getting up-and-down) in 2009 to 169th this year (54.15 percent). He went from 51st in putting average to 99th. Hence his scoring average rose almost a stroke per round, from 69.97 (12th) to 70.95 (96th).

All that translated to a drop in earnings from $3.69 million (ninth) to $1.51 million (57th). He had half as many top 10s (three) as the year before, when he won the U.S. Open and finished second at Quail Hollow, third in San Diego and fifth at the PGA Championship.

Glover also hit far fewer fairways than he did in 2009. He slipped from 65.49 percent (70th) to 62.84 percent (111th). As a result, he dropped from second to 28th in total driving.

Glover played a career-low 23 Tour events after playing 26 to 31 in each of the previous six years. He figures he’ll need a few more starts in 2011 to get into a better rhythm.

Glover says: “I got into a rut where I didn’t hit the ball as well or make putts. That’s a recipe for turning 70s into 73s. . . . I think it’s a confidence thing. Putting for me is all confidence. Same thing with ballstriking. When you start seeing a 7-iron shot go a long way away from where you’re looking, doubt creeps in. I fought that some.”

– Jeff Rude

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