Toy Box notes: Poulter’s puttering

Finding the perfect putter takes time. Just ask Ian Poulter, who used a Rife putter to win the Accenture Match Play Championship.

Poulter first picked up a Rife putter on Monday of the 2008 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines. He asked for several modifications, and Rife produced a Poulter-ized putter at a shop in San Diego. The putter had a Rife Antigua head with a custom plumber’s neck hosel.

Poulter tried the new putter at Torrey. The next month, though, it was out of his bag. He wanted a clickier sound and harder feel.

So Rife technicians changed the spacing of the grooves on the Antigua face; they also altered one of the alignment lines because Poulter likes to address the ball closer to the heel. In addition, they added tungsten plugs for more weight. He put it back in his bag at New Orleans in April 2009.

Rife will introduce a faithful reproduction of Poulter’s putter called the Aruba ($149.95) within three months.

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The rest of Poulter’s bag: Cobra ZL driver (9.5 degree, Fujikura 6.0 Motore Speeder X shaft), Titleist 909F2 3-wood (13.5 degree with Fujikura Rombax 7X07 shaft), 906F2 5-wood (18 degree, Grafalloy Prolite 35X shaft), 909H hybrid (19 degree, Aldila NV Hybrid 85X shaft), Cobra Pro CB (4-7) and Pro MB (8-PW) with True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 shafts, Titleist Vokey Design Spin Milled wedges (54 and 60 degree) and Titleist Pro V1x ball.

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Podcast episode

Toy Box

Why did Srixon make a yellow golf ball?

Why is the golf ball white? James Achenbach explains, and talks about Srixon’s new yellow ball.

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Yellow is in: It was a colorful week for golf, with the flashy Poulter winning the Accenture and players using yellow golf balls in two events.

Tim Clark played the new yellow Srixon Z-Star at the Accenture, and Shigeki Maruyama used a yellow Bridgestone TourStage ball at the Mayakoba Golf Classic.

“No one has given me a hard time,” Clark said of his fellow players. “I think they’re all jealous.”

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To the Rescue: Yes, some of the hybrids used last year on the PGA Tour had grooves that do not conform to 2010 standards. Tim Clark, for one, was forced to give up one of his favorite clubs, a 25-degree Rescue Dual.

So TaylorMade found an old 23-degree Rescue Dual head (the club no longer is in the line). New groove regulations apply only to clubs with 25 or more degrees of loft.

Then the UST iRod shaft was removed from the old 25-degree hybrid and installed in the 23-degree club.

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Diablos in the desert: Callaway’s new Diablo Edge family of clubs was in the spotlight at the WGC Match Play as Jeev Milkha Singh used Diablo Forged irons (3-9) and quarterfinalist Thongchai Jaidee played a Diablo Edge driver (9.5 degree), 3-wood (15 degree) and hybrid (21 degree).

The difference in stock lofts between Callaway’s Diablo Forged and X-Forged irons is dramatic. A Diablo Forged 8-iron, for example, is 35 degrees. The X-Forged 8-iron is 39 degrees.

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In Beckman’s bag: Cameron Beckman, who won the Mayakoba Golf Classic, is a Callaway guy all the way: FT Tour driver (9.5 degree), X 3-wood (15 degree), FT hybrid (17 degree), X-Forged irons (4-9) Diablo Forged 3-iron, X-Forged wedges (54 and 60 degree), Odyssey Tour Milled putter and Tour i(s) golf ball.

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