Ferrari metalwoods: For those who can't buy the car

A redheaded Ferrari golf driver (Ferrari is famous for its red cars) will carry a suggested retail price of $2,000.

Stuck without a spare $250,000 for a Ferrari Spider automobile? One alternative: a Ferrari golf metalwood, the product of a new collaboration between Ferrari and Cobra Puma Golf.

New Ferrari cars can be found in the $250,000 to $350,000 price range, and the alliance between Ferrari and Cobra Puma has produced some high-priced items of its own.

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A redheaded Ferrari golf driver (Ferrari is famous for its red cars) will carry a suggested retail price of $2,000. The price tag for a Ferrari Luxury Bag will be $2,400. The leather used for the bag is the same kind used for the seats in Ferrari GT cars.

All the Ferrari-Cobra Puma products will be available in July, including apparel such as $120 polo shirts and $250 jackets patterned after the interior of a Ferrari car.

Shoes, which are the nucleus of the Puma empire, will sell for $600 and are handcrafted in Italy with full-grain leather upper and sole. The stitching is designed after a Ferrari interior.

This isn’t the first collaboration between car companies and golf. Carmakers have prominently associated themselves with professional golf tournaments for more than 50 years.

Buick first stepped into the golf spotlight with the Buick Open in 1958, and many other carmakers followed. BMW, Cadillac, Chrysler, Ford, Honda, Hyundai, Jeep, Lexus, Mercedes Benz, Nissan and Oldsmobile are among the car manufacturers who have been involved in the sponsorship of big-league tournaments.

In recent years, some carmakers have decided to team up with major golf club manufacturers, placing their names and logos on high-tech clubs.

Porsche and TaylorMade teamed up in 2006, producing a Porsche Design collection that included an adjustable driver with six different weight plugs.

Lamborghini and Callaway unveiled a partnership in 2010, with the companies combining research capabilities to produce a form of carbon fiber called Forged Composite. This material is used by Callaway in its multi-material Razr Fit drivers.

On May 27, while the Indianapolis 500 was being run, officials of Cobra Puma Golf were preparing for a June 1 announcement of this partnership with legendary automobile company Ferrari.

The alliance between Puma and Ferrari goes back to 2004, but Cobra is adding a golf element to the relationship.

Ferrari’s famous prancing-horse logo will be available to consumers on golf clubs, shoes, apparel and accessories from Cobra Puma Golf, starting July 1 (www.ferrarigolfcollection.com).

“This is a true marriage of art and science,” Cobra president Bob Philion said. “Not only is it a luxury golf collection, but it will also provide us with a halo effect across Cobra Puma Golf.”

The multi-material driver, which uses Cobra’s ZL technology along with new aerodynamics, is the only golf club in the initial release of products from Cobra Puma and Ferrari. Other clubs will follow.

“This is a long-term partnership,” Philion said. “The important thing for us was to have a 360 package for that high-end consumer. This is attention to detail to the max (such as kangaroo leather golf grips from Australia).

“It is very exciting to me that our design team and their engineers are working together. They are doing a lot of the same things with cars that we are trying to do with golf clubs -- such as light weight and superb aerodynamics.”

Tom Preece, Cobra’s lead club designer, has spent a considerable amount of time at Ferrari’s Maranello, Italy, headquarters to maximize the benefits of the collaboration.

Ian Poulter will be Cobra Puma’s poster boy in this project, and Philion promises “more exciting news to come” in this newest union of cars and golf.

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