The Tour Blog

Subscribe

Tease photo

Rude: Experts like Woods' chances after surgery

Jeff Rude

It sounds like an April Fools' Day joke, but it isn’t. Tiger Woods doesn’t much talk about his injuries, so it follows his inner comic wouldn’t weigh in about something as serious as spinal health.

Woods again dominated golf headlines Tuesday for reasons other than performance, a trend of late. Once again his spine was in the spotlight, never good for a professional athlete.

For Woods that meant Monday microdiscectomy surgery to fix a pinched nerve in his back, a procedure that knocks him out of next week’s Masters. The news is surprising because it comes a week before the year’s first major championship, and smart money had figured he’d play there if he had to crawl to the first tee. Dumb money might not be right in Las Vegas, but it was here.

The fact that Woods didn’t defer surgery until after the Masters probably means a couple of things. One, he’s more interested in long-term health than next week. Two, he wasn’t ready for Augusta National, given his physical condition, recent inactivity and inconsistent performance in 2014.

The screaming news means plenty more, big picture and small. Yes, the ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Rusty, or ready? Tiger's back cuts Masters prep

Jim McCabe

Missing the Arnold Palmer Invitational for just the second time since turning professional, Tiger Woods is in a precarious position regarding his Masters prep work.

Should he sit out the Valero Texas Open and Shell Houston Open, as expected, in the next two weeks, he would have only 14 competitive rounds under his belt headed into Augusta. Woods withdrew from the Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill in Orlando, Fla., two days before it began.

Not what he would have planned, but for the Woods of this era – the version who, at 38, is older and more cautious of injury – it’s part of a game plan that doesn’t push too much. He played just 19 rounds before Augusta a year ago, 21 in 2012, 17 in 2011, none in 2010 (the comeback from the infamous personal-life crash) and 10 in 2009 when he was rebounding from knee surgery.

Those numbers are in stark contrast to the Woods of vintage form. In the years when he won the Masters (1997, 2001, '02, '05) he played an average of 29.75 rounds before Augusta.

Which isn’t to say that he is lost when he shows up at Augusta without ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Woods tops early odds for 2014 Masters

Bill Zimmerman

World No. 1 Tiger Woods, who won five events during the PGA Tour's 2013 season yet came up short at all four majors, stands atop the odds to win the 2014 Masters. Woods tops the list at 6-1 despite an ailing back that prompted a WD at the Honda Classic and a final-round 78 at the WGC-Cadillac Championship. One has to wonder how much more of a favorite to win he could be with a strong (read: healthy) showing at the Arnold Palmer Invitational next week.

Rory McIlroy is close behind at 8-1, with Jason Day third at 12-1 and Phil Mickelson tied with defending champion Adam Scott and Dustin Johnson at 15-1.

Also of note: Last week's winner, Patrick Reed – who attended GRU-Augusta – is not listed individually. For now, that places him in the "field" at 15-1.

• • •

Odds to win 2014 Masters, as posted by the sports book at the Las Vegas Hilton:

  • Tiger Woods . . . 6-1
  • Rory McIlroy . . . 8-1
  • Jason Day . . . 12-1
  • Phil Mickelson . . . 15-1
  • Dustin Johnson . . . 15-1
  • Adam Scott . . . 15-1
  • Matt Kuchar . . . 25-1
  • Bubba Watson . . . 25-1
  • Zach Johnson . . . 25-1
  • Jordan Spieth . . . 25-1
  • Justin Rose . . . 30-1
  • Henrik Stenson . . . 30-1
  • Jason Dufner . . . 30-1
  • Brandt Snedeker . . . 35-1
  • Charl Schwartzel ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Report: U.S. Open targets Torrey Pines for 2021

Bill Zimmerman

Torrey Pines' South course in San Diego is the USGA's choice to host the U.S. Open in 2021, according to a local report – which could return Tiger Woods at age 45 to the site of his 14th (and most recent) win in a major.

The choice will go to the city council for approval, San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer told the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Torrey Pines hosted the U.S. Open in 2008 – when Woods defeated Rocco Mediate while battling a severe knee injury that would later sideline him for months. Woods remains second all-time to Jack Nicklaus since winning the storied Monday playoff – when the tournament climbed among the top U.S. Opens for attendance and ratings; San Diego State University calculates its economic impact at $142 million, the Union-Tribune reported.

As our live blog recorded the deciding hole at the time:

Rocco Mediate’s driving woes crept into his game at the wrong time. Mediate pulled his drive into a fairway bunker, and he pulled his 183-yard approach left into the stands. After a free drop, Mediate pitched to 20 feet.

Woods’ birdie try crept toward the hole, but he left it short of the middle ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Augusta National loses 'Eisenhower Tree'

Alex Miceli

Mother Nature did what the 34th president of the United States could not: have the famed Eisenhower Tree removed from Augusta National.

In a statement released by Augusta National Golf Club, chairman Billy Payne confirmed the removal during the weekend of the tree named after President Dwight Eisenhower.

“The loss of the Eisenhower Tree is difficult news to accept,” Payne said in a statement. “We obtained opinions from the best arborists available and, unfortunately, were advised that no recovery was possible.”

A loblolly pine on the 17th hole named after the former president because he hit it so often, stood about 210 yards off the tee and forced players to either carry the tree or stay right.

“I think for the modern golfer in good weather, (the Eisenhower tree didn’t matter) because they're more concerned with on top of the hill, they're more concerned with putting it onto the seventh green or blocking it into those huge pines down the right,” three-time Masters champion Nick Faldo said. “It's only if we get that cold one that Mike Weir won or the wet ones moons ago, then it was in play.”

Bubba Watson, the 2012 Masters champion ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Augusta experiences earthquake Friday night

Cassie Stein

A 4.1 magnitude earthquake hit Augusta, Ga., at 10:23 p.m. Friday, which originated in Edgefield, S.C.

According to WRDW News 12 Augusta, the impact of the earthquake may have caused damaged to a water tower located near Augusta National Golf Club. There is water coming out of the overflow valve.

Earlier in the week, Augusta was covered with snow and ice. The water tower was leaking prior to the earthquake, but it is unknown if it was caused additional damage.

According to the Augusta Chronicle, it is still unknown if the earthquake has caused any damaged to the course or if the water tower leak will impact Augusta National.

The Masters Tournament is less than two months away – 53 days if you’re counting.


Tease photo

USGA hopes Opens can take root at Pinehurst

Bradley S. Klein

PINEHURST, N.C. – Once the formalities of the U.S. Golf Association annual meeting in Pinehurst were done last Saturday night, officials could get down to important matters. Like playing golf.

Outgoing USGA president Glen Nager had left town without even attending the final night’s dinner. Such is the fate of those who lose out when they seek to reshape the group’s governance structure. Meanwhile, new president Tom O’Toole Jr. (who serves on a volunteer basis) and executive director Mike Davis (a full-time employee) were out Sunday playing Pinehurst No. 2. For Davis, who hadn’t even brought his clubs and had to borrow a set from the resort, it was his first round on the restored Donald Ross gem – it had reopened in April 2011. Not that he was unfamiliar with the place. He’s walked the restored layout numerous times, most recently Tuesday during the week of the annual meeting. He toured it with architect Bill Coore, who had teamed with Ben Crenshaw in redoing the famed layout.

Davis spent a lot of his time during the annual meeting explaining what is something of a risky enterprise – staging back-to-back national championships on No. 2 this ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Augusta National flourishes in winter weather

The first major of the year is still more than two months away, but if you’re itching for sights of the Masters, you’re in luck.

A rare snowstorm left more than 2 inches of snow and ice in much of the Southeast, leaving commuters stranded and several areas in disarray.

The beauty of Augusta National may be one of the few things that could offer a silver lining to the dangerous weather.

Photos bounced around the Internet Wednesday, showing the famed course covered in snowfall. The image of Magnolia Lane in spring weather is beloved, but it doesn’t look too bad in late January, either.

The first round of the 2014 Masters Tournament will take place April 10.


Tease photo

Riley recognizes shortcomings but is OK with it all

Jim McCabe

SAN DIEGO – “On a whim,” Chris Riley successfully took on the challenge of a Monday qualifier to get into last week’s Farmers Insurance Open.

As for the decision to have left the competitive world of the PGA Tour in the first place? Well, that surely wasn’t “on a whim.” Closer to the truth to say that Riley had a long, slow departure, because he seemed to take a few steps toward the exit each and every season. His desire to leave was born out of his dislike of the travel, yes, but also for the keen sense he had that he wasn’t on a level playing field.

Riley knew he had to be on his game at all times, just to make cuts, while mega-talents such as his friend Tiger Woods and fellow San Diegan Phil Mickelson could have bad tournaments and still contend and maybe even win. In his best years on the PGA Tour, from his rookie year of 1999 to 2004, Riley was a marvel for doing so much with seemingly one hand tied behind his back. His average finish in the driving-distance category was 136th; for greens in regulation, it was 150th.

Talk ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Golf's major championships: Dates for 2014

77th Masters

  • When: April 10-13
  • Where: Augusta (Ga.) National Golf Club
  • Par/Yardage: 72 / 7,435
  • Defending champion: Adam Scott (9-under 279)
  • Purse (2013): $8 million ($1.44 million to winner)

• • •

114th U.S. Open

  • When: June 12-15
  • Where: Pinehurst Resort (No. 2), Pinehurst, N.C.
  • Par/Yardage: 70 / 7,565
  • Defending champion: Justin Rose (1-over 281)
  • Purse (2013): $8 million ($1.44 million to winner)

• • •

143rd Open Championship

  • When: July 17-20
  • Where: Royal Liverpool Golf Club, Hoylake, England
  • Par/Yardage: 72 / 7,350
  • Defending champion: Phil Mickelson (3-under 281)
  • Purse (2013): $8 million ($1.44 million to winner)

• • •

96th PGA Championship

  • When: Aug. 7-10
  • Where: Valhalla Golf Club, Louisville, Ky.
  • Par/Yardage: 71 / 7,458
  • Defending champion: Jason Dufner (10-under 270)
  • Purse (2013): $8 million ($1.44 million to winner)

• • •

69th U.S. Women’s Open

  • When: June 19-22
  • Where: Pinehurst Resort (No. 2), Pinehurst, N.C.
  • Par/Yardage: 70 / 6,649
  • Defending champion: Inbee Park (8-under 280)
  • Purse (2013): $3.25 million ($585,000 to winner)

• • •

40th Ryder Cup

  • When: Sept. 26-28
  • Where: Gleneagles (Centenary Course), Perthshire, Scotland
  • Par/Yardage: 72 / 7,296
  • Defending champion: Europe (141/2-131/2)

Tease photo

Several LPGA-season honors still up for grabs

Beth Ann Nichols

Inbee Park might have the Rolex Player of the Year locked up, and deservedly so, but there are several other big titles still up for grabs as the season winds down this week in south Florida.

Caroline Masson leads the Louise Suggs Rolex Rookie of the Year race by 11 points over Moriya Jutanugarn. And if Masson pulls it off this week at Tiburon Golf Club, it will be with a broken thumb.

Earlier this month in Japan, Masson fractured her right thumb while playing ping pong with her caddie, Jason McDede on Tuesday before the tournament started. She won the match and went on to finish tied for 60th in the golf tournanment.

“I float (the thumb) on top,” said Masson of how she competes with a brace. “If the divots get too deep ... glad they don’t have rough here.”

Japan’s Ayako Uehara would have to win this week to have a chance at the title. She currently trails Masson by 90 points.

• • •

VARE RACE: Stacy Lewis and Suzann Pettersen are battling for their first Vare Trophy award. Lewis leads Pettersen by the slimmest of margins, 0.104, while last year’s winner, Inbee Park, trails Lewis ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

VIDEO: McIlroy, Woodland burn rubber in BMW i3

Golfweek Staff

Rory McIlroy and Gary Woodland competed in a driving challenge Tuesday to kick off BMW Championship week.

The two PGA Tour players competed on a specially created driving course at Six Flags Great America for the BMW Championship and Evans Scholars Foundation. BMW, in turn, made a $10,000 donation in their honor. The two drove a BMW i3, which is an electric vehicle made primarily of carbon fiber that will launch in spring 2014. McIlroy and Woodland were two of the first people to drive the car since it was revealed globally on July 29.

They were only two seconds slower than the track record, and were met at the finish line by Evans Scholars Justin Cruz and Yesenia Juarez, both students at Northwestern. All proceeds from the BMW Championship will benefit the Evans Scholars Foundation. Since 2007, the BMW Championship has raised more than $14 million for the Evans Scholars Foundation.

The first player who makes a hole-in-one this week at Conway Farms’ 17th wins a new BMW i3.


Tease photo

Notes: Nordqvist aces; U.S. rallies; more

Julie Williams

PARKER, Colo. – When Anna Nordqvist holed a 7-iron at the par-3 17th, it ended all chances of a comeback from Morgan Pressel and Jessica Korda. The Europeans put their first, and only, full point on the board courtesy of that shot as the Americans rallied to within a point.

Nordqvist, from 180 yards, thought the shot might go long until she saw the ball pitch and drop into the hole. It was an opportune turn of events, set up by good putting earlier in the day from Nordqvist’s partner Caroline Hedwall.

Said Nordqvist: “Caroline made key putts on 13 and 14 and then we just sort of battled in there and had a good finish the last two holes.”

Nordqvist’s is the first hole-in-one in Solheim Cup history.

• • •

2. SPIRIT LEADER: Michelle Wie walked to the 17th green with her hand cupped beside her right ear, urging the crowd to go crazy for her and partner Brittany Lang. Wie had just stuck her shot on the front of the green and Lang lagged to 4 feet. When Suzann Pettersen missed her five-footer to halve, Wie calmly dropped the winning putt.

A hole earlier, Wie hit the par 5 ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

LPGA notes: Wie, Pressel still in Solheim mix

Beth Ann Nichols

It’s crunch time for the Solheim Cup, and believe it or not, Michelle Wie is very much in the conversation for making the U.S. team.

How can it be that a woman with only two top 10s to her credit in 2013 and a putting posture that screams desperation is still among the top 13 American players? Answer: We’re not that deep.

Wie would need to win next week’s Ricoh Women’s British Open to make the team on points. She’s currently 13th on the list, with 160.5.

Otherwise, captain Meg Mallon would need to make Wie one of her two captain’s picks, which isn’t out of the question considering that she already has three Solheim rookies who are locks for the team (Lexi Thompson, Jessica Korda and Lizette Salas) and Wie is a two-time participant. Thompson and Korda are currently in on points while Salas is safely in at No. 21 in the rankings. (The top two players in the Rolex Rankings not otherwise qualified through Solheim points earn spots.)

Jennifer Johnson is the only player who can finish second at the British Open and crack the top eight (assuming current ...

Click here to continue reading


Tease photo

Biographer adds 3 missing titles to Suggs' resume

Beth Ann Nichols

Louise Suggs has won so many tournaments during her Hall of Fame career that she can’t remember them all.

Now, six weeks shy of her 90th birthday, Suggs can add three more to her total. Elaine Scott, Suggs’ biographer and a former LPGA communications director, discovered three missing titles, and the tour concurred.

The LPGA will add two titles from 1961 – Sea Island Open and the Naples Pro-Am – during Suggs’ last full year on tour, plus the Pro-Lady Victory National Championship, which she won as an amateur with Ben Hogan in 1946.

With 61 victories, Suggs passes the late Patty Berg (60) to rank fourth all time on the LPGA list, behind Kathy Whitworth (88), Mickey Wright (82) and Annika Sorenstam (69).

Scott said players kept records in their car trunks in those early years and drove down the highway with scoreboards attached to their roofs.

The victory with Hogan is especially significant, given the story behind their partnership. Suggs beat Hogan (playing from the same tees) at Medinah’s No. 3

Course on the back nine of the first round, and Hogan caught grief in the locker room. The next morning, he gave Suggs the silent treatment until ...

Click here to continue reading

  • PGA
  • CHMP
  • WEB
[[PGAtourn]] Full Leaderboard >
Prev
  • [[player._CurPos]]
  • [[player._Lname]], [[player._Fname]]
  • [[player._TournParRel]]
  • [[player._Thru]]
Next
[[CHMPtourn]] Full Leaderboard >
Prev
  • [[player._CurPos]]
  • [[player._Lname]], [[player._Fname]]
  • [[player._TournParRel]]
  • [[player._Thru]]
Next
[[NWIDtourn]] Full Leaderboard >
Prev
  • [[player._CurPos]]
  • [[player._Lname]], [[player._Fname]]
  • [[player._TournParRel]]
  • [[player._Thru]]
Next