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5 Things: Recari outduels Creamer at Marathon

Golfweek Staff

Beatriz Recari and Paula Creamer fulfilled their promise of a Sunday duel by taking the fight for the Marathon Classic down to the last hole in Sylvania, Ohio, with Recari emerging victorious.

Creamer finished one shot back, with Jodi Ewart Shadoff and Lexi Thompson another three shots behind, the latter thanks to a hole-in-one.

Here are 5 Things to Know from the LPGA this week:

• • •

1. RECARI RISES: A fist-pump after the 4-footer for par that sealed the deal indicated Beatriz Recari's second win of the LPGA season.

The Spaniard took the lead with a birdie at No. 14 and matched Paula Creamer the rest of the way, sinking a 4-footer for par at the par-5 18th to wrap up a 66 at Highland Meadows that left her one shot ahead of Creamer. Recari finished 72 holes at 17-under 267.

Recari also won the Kia Classic in March after beating I.K. Kim in sudden death. Recari is known as the iron woman on tour after playing all 27 events in 2012. Her missed cut at the U.S. Women's Open ended a streak of 46 consecutive made cuts. The 26-year-oldl sat out of the Manulife Financial LPGA ...

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Birdies and bogeys: Perry, Rose victories vastly different

James Achenbach

OMAHA, Neb. – Golf fans at the U.S. Senior Open experienced a flash flood of birdies. Kenny Perry, the winner, had nine birdies all by himself in a final-round 63.

It was a celebration of superlative golf and it was fun to watch.

So I ask for your opinion: birdies or bogeys?

During the past month, I traveled to both the U.S. Open and U.S. Senior Open. These two U.S. Golf Association national championships might as well be held on separate planets, because one is nothing like the other.

Justin Rose’s winning score at the U.S. Open was 1-over par for 72 holes. Perry’s winning score at the U.S. Senior Open was 13-under par. I believe this difference of 14 strokes is meaningful and should be discussed.

Birdies or bogeys? I am betting most golfers would rather see birdies rather than train wrecks. However, I have received several emails supporting the severe course setups of the U.S. Open.

Let’s take a closer look at this year’s championships. The U.S. Open was staged at Merion Golf Club outside Philadelphia. The U.S. Senior Open was held at Omaha (Neb.) Country ...

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Park adjusts to unusual place for LPGA player: spotlight

Beth Ann Nichols

When Inbee Park left Sebonack Golf Club on Sunday evening after her historic U.S. Women’s Open triumph, she and her team went for a celebratory dinner at Mount Fuji of Southampton, a Japanese fusion restaurant. The weary but jubilant group arrived in New York City at 2 a.m., and Park got little shuteye before embarking on a media blitz unprecedented for an LPGA player.

The hottest player in golf walked the streets of New York with the U.S. Women’s Open trophy in tow, making appearances on "Today," ESPN’s "SportsCenter" and Golf Channel’s "Morning Drive." She also taped segments that were aired on NBC and ABC affiliates nationwide.

Media tours like that don’t happen for LPGA players in the U.S.

“I thought I’d never get to do that in my life,” said Park, whose phone rang nonstop in the days that followed. She received letters from the president of her native South Korea, Park Geun-hye, and golf's king, Arnold Palmer. The word from back home is that she’s now a superstar.

From New York, Park crossed the country to house hunt in Las Vegas. She toured about a dozen ...

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Cathrea's 'bubble' mentality yields low-am honors

Julie Williams

It is nearly impossible to miss Casie Cathrea on the golf course. The 17-year-old committed to Oklahoma State University in the fall of 2011, and shortly thereafter began wearing bold punches of Cowgirls orange.

On Sunday, that meant day-glo orange shorts and a dinner-platter sized OSU belt buckle. In her first U.S. Women’s Open start, Cathrea finished as the low amateur, and that’s mostly because of a final-round 70 at Sebonack Golf Club. It was her first sub-par score of the week, and still included bogeys at Nos. 17 and 18.

Cathrea was one of two players to shoot 70 Sunday. It was the lowest final-round score. Cathrea made five birdies in the first eight holes, then bogeyed the ninth. She added seven more pars before reaching No. 17.

“I was just trying to stay in my own bubble, not get ahead of myself,” Cathrea said. “I know I had the tendency to do that earlier this week. I tried to just stay in my own little mindset.”

Cathrea closed the week at 9-over 297, two shots ahead of World No. 1 amateur Lydia Ko, an accomplishment in itself.

During the past year, Cathrea has turned increased ...

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How it Happened: Park wins U.S. Women's Open

Golfweek Staff

So let's see, Inbee Park has won two majors this season already – one in convincing fashion, another in a playoff – and carries a four-shot lead into Sunday's final round of the U.S. Women's Open. Chalk up another one for the aforementioned convincing fashion.

By the time Park made her first bogey of the final round at Sebonack Golf Club – two back-to-back, in fact – she had expanded her lead to six shots. From there it was smooth sailing in the Hamptons en route to victory at 8 under par. And so it goes with the South Korean, any way you cut it: While Park isn't perfect, she's the World No. 1 for a reason.

I.K. Kim finished second and So Yeon Ryu third, the only other players under par.

In the battle for low amateur, Casie Cathrea fired the low number of the day, a 2-under 70, to pull away from Doris Chen and Lydia Ko.

Recap the highlights right here – and scroll down for our previous coverage of the Women's Open.

• • •

Update No. 28: 5:41 p.m. EDT

With no worries or pressure, Inbee Park reaches the par-5 18th's green ...

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3 up, 3 down for Park in Grand Slam quest

Beth Ann Nichols

Inbee Park’s historic win at Sebonack Golf Club brings up an interesting question: What is a Grand Slam?

What once seemed so obvious to golf fans now comes with a twist. Park’s four-stroke victory at the 68th U.S. Women’s Open on Sunday makes her only the second woman in LPGA history to win the first three consecutive majors. Babe Zaharias accomplished the feat in 1950.

When Park heads to the Old Course in St. Andrews for the Ricoh Women’s British Open on Aug. 1-4, she will be vying for her fourth consecutive major. Any other year in the modern era, that would mean she’s on the verge of winning the elusive Grand Slam.

This year, however, there are five major championships up for grabs, and according to golf historian Martin Davis, that means she needs to win all five to, by definition, win the Grand Slam.

The term "grand slam" originates from bridge, a card game in which players win tricks. When someone clears the table, they earn 13 tricks, or a "grand slam." Bridge was quite popular around the time Bobby Jones won the four biggest tournaments of his era in 1930, prompting ...

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Park doubles Open lead in familiar fashion

Julie Williams

When multiple shots separate a player from her closest pursuer entering the weekend at a major championship, complacency can become an issue. At some point, the image of Inbee Park running away from an LPGA field, major or otherwise, begins to feel like deja vu.

It’s possible crowds and scribes have already hit that point. That Park doubled her lead on I.K. Kim over the course of a windy Saturday at Sebonack suggests she hasn’t. There was the streak of three bogeys at the beginning of the back nine, but they were followed by the improbable 30-foot birdie putt that floated over the top tier on No. 14 green – then dove into the edge of the hole at the last minute. There was the approach shot that trickled up against the lip of a greenside bunker at No. 18, but from there, Park got up and down for birdie.

By day’s end, Park, with her 71, was the only player to sign for a round under par. At 10 under for the tournament, she is four shots ahead of I.K. Kim. Jodi Ewart Shadoff is within seven shots, but the leaderboard drops off after that ...

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Elder Korda, caddie part ways mid-round at Open

Beth Ann Nichols

Jessica Korda parted ways with her caddie after the ninth hole of the U.S. Women’s Open and promptly told her boyfriend to grab the bag. Korda shot 40 on the front nine with Jason Gilroyed, her caddie of one year, and was 1 under on the back nine with her boyfriend of 18 months, Johnny DelPrete.

“Had a couple of disagreements here and there, and I wasn't in the right state of mind,” said Korda. “I just was more consumed on what was going on just not my way. And I knew I needed to switch and just have a little bit more fun out there.”

Gilroyed has been caddying on the LPGA since 1996. Former bosses include Rosie Jones, I.K. Kim and two stints with Cristie Kerr. Gilroyed said the relationship had been deteriorating in recent weeks.

“It’s a shame it had to go down on the ninth hole,” he said by phone.

Korda, 20, came into the third round at Sebonack Golf Club trailing leader Inbee Park by six. She two-putted the par-5 18th for birdie to shoot 4-over 76 Saturday and stands tied for sixth.

Prior to Gilroyed, Korda had Annika Sorenstam ...

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Notes: Salas' mindset at Open; Park's stats; more

Beth Ann Nichols

Lizette Salas was standing in front of the clubhouse talking to her parents when two young kids came up for an autograph.

“You did a great job today,” the little girl said to a teary-eyed Salas.

Salas kindly signed for her small fans and smiled wide. They were obviously unaware of the painful 10-over 82 Salas shot in Round 3 that put her out of the tournament.

“I have no idea what happened,” said Salas, who played in the penultimate group. “I tried to stay patient; I tried to stay calm. I kept thinking to myself, ‘When is this nightmare going to end?’ ”

Salas hit only 10 greens in the third round and had 35 putts. She didn’t spray the ball – just hit it in all the wrong spots. It also didn’t help that her group was put on the clock on No. 9.

“You would think I would learn after the last year, what happened at the Open and the Kraft,” she said.

The former USC player played in the last group on Sunday at the 2013 Kraft and shot 79, tumbling into a tie for 25th. At last year’s Women’s Open at Blackwolf Run ...

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U.S. Women's Open: Tee times, final round

As she chases the third leg of a grand slam, Inbee Park will play for the second day in a row alongside second-place I.K. Kim in the U.S. Women's Open.

The two will tee off at 1:25 p.m. EDT at Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y. Jodi Ewart Shadoff will start the day in third place in the group ahead, paired with So Yeon Ryu.

Other groups to watch include Jessica Korda, who fired her caddie midway through Saturday's third round, alongside Ai Miyazato; Doris Chen and Casie Cathrea in the only all-amateur pairing; former Open champ Paula Creamer alongside Angela Stanford, a five-time LPGA winner who seeks her first victory in a major; and World No. 2 Stacy Lewis alongside Morgan Pressel.

• • •

Complete tee times and pairings for the final round of the U.S. Women's Open at Sebonack Golf Club:

7:22 a.m.: Eun-Hee Ji, Jackie Barenborg Stoelting

7:33 a.m.: Austin Ernst, Carlota Ciganda

7:44 a.m.: Cynthia Lacrosse, a-Brooke Mackenzie Henderson

7:55 a.m.: a-Nelly Korda, Danah Bordner

8:06 a.m.: Caroline Westrup, a-Yueer Feng

8:17 a.m.: Amy Meier, Meena Lee ...

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How it Happened: Park extends USWO lead

Golfweek Staff

Inbee Park doesn't do a lot of talking, but her play Saturday attracted the lion's share of the commentary as she chases a women's grand slam at Sebonack.

Having won the first two majors of the season, Park took the second-round lead of the U.S. Women's Open on Friday with a 68 and followed up with a 71 Saturday – a drop in score, sure, but understandable as it was the only scorecard turned in under par during the third round.

She'll play in the day's last group alongside I.K. Kim again Sunday – Kim's 73 good enough to remain in second place.

Just three other golfers are under par for the tournament. Jodi Ewart Shadoff's 74 dropped her to third at 3 under, while World No. 5 So Yeon Ryu and Angela Stanford are T-4 at 1 under after a 73 and 74 respectively.

Recap the highlights of the day in Southampton, N.Y., right here – and scroll down to take a look at our extensive preview coverage from Sebonack:

• • •

Update No. 34 ...

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Korda sisters make cut together at Sebonack

Julie Williams

For all the dreariness that greeted the 41 players who arrived at Sebonack early Saturday morning to finish the fog-delayed second round of the U.S. Women's Open, much depended on those final few holes.

Most notably, Nicole Jeray, among the very last players to finish the second round, double bogeyed No. 17 then bogeyed No. 18, thus falling to 8 over for the tournament. Those final two holes cost Jeray another check in her “made cuts” column, but it helped move the cut from 5 over to 6 over, allowing nine extra players a spot in the final two rounds. Sixty-eight players advanced.

Among those players was Nelly Korda, the 14-year-old sister of LPGA player Jessica, 20. The elder is T-5 after 36 holes. Nelly Korda became the sixth and final amateur to make the cut. The Kordas are bunking in one big house this week on Long Island, but Jessica and Nelly were on opposite sides of the tee sheet for the first two rounds.

“I saw Nelly for a whole 15 minutes (Thursday) night before I had to go bed,” Jessica said Friday. “I bought her dinner and said, ‘Good luck tomorrow, I’ll see you ...

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U.S. Women's Open: Tee times, third round

Golfweek Staff

Here are complete groupings and tee times for Saturday's third round of the U.S. Women's Open at Sebonack Golf Club, where leader Inbee Park and I.K. Kim will play in the final group.

• • •

No. 1 tee, 10:39 a.m.: Stacy Lewis, Dewi Claire Schreefel, Azahara Muñoz

No. 10 tee, 10:39 a.m.: Danah Bordner, Sarah-Jane Smith, a-Casie Cathrea

No. 1 tee, 10:50 a.m.: Morgan Pressel, a-Brooke Mackenzie Henderson, Jennifer Rosales

No. 10 tee, 10:50 a.m.: Chella Choi, Pornanong Phatlum, Mo Martin

No. 1 tee, 11:01 a.m.: Mi Jung Hur, Karrie Webb, Ai Miyazato

No. 10 tee, 11:01 a.m.: Cynthia Lacrosse, a-Doris Chen, Na Yeon Choi

No. 1 tee, 11:12 a.m.: Mariajo Uribe, Shanshan Feng, Amy Yang

No. 10 tee, 11:12 a.m.: a-Lydia Ko, Carlota Ciganda, Natalie Gulbis

No. 1 tee, 11:23 a.m.: Maude-Aimee LeBlanc, Amy Meier, Ryann O’toole

No. 10 tee, 11:23 a.m.: Becky Morgan, Thidapa Suwannapura, Austin Ernst

No. 1 tee, 11:34 a.m.: Caroline Masson, Paula Creamer, Catriona Matthew

No. 10 tee, 11:34 a.m.: Mika Miyazato, Gerina Piller, Hee Kyung Seo

No ...

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Wie withdraws, citing illness, during 2nd round

Julie Williams

Michelle Wie did not return to Sebonack on a dreary Saturday morning to complete her second round at the U.S. Women’s Open.

Play was suspended late Friday evening because of fog, leaving Wie one hole to play. She withdrew before play resumed Saturday morning, citing illness.

Wie, whose first-round 80 included a quadruple-bogey on the 10th hole (her first), was 3 over through 17 holes on Friday. At 11 over for the tournament, she would not have made the cut.

This year marked the 10th Women’s Open start for Wie, 23. She also withdrew in 2007 and missed the cut in 2008 and 2010.

Candie Kung, who had three holes remaining in her second round, also has withdrawn. Kung was 11 over with three holes to play.


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5 Things: Park leads USWO, Kims trade places

Golfweek Staff

The 2013 U.S. Women's Open on Friday turned into somewhat of a case of the haves and have-nots at Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y.

While Inbee Park and I.K. Kim can boast low scores at 68 and 69 respectively, just eight golfers completed two rounds with a score under par.

And past achievements meant little in some cases, with the cut line on the wrong side of several big names as the round was halted.

Play is scheduled to resume at 7 a.m. EDT, the USGA said, with the third round expected to start about 10:30 a.m. EDT, the LPGA said.

Here are 5 Things to Know about Friday's second round at the U.S. Women's Open:

• • •

1. INBEE IN CONTROL: Having led most of Thursday until a late surge by Ha-Neul Kim bumped her to second for the night, patience paid off a day later for Inbee Park as she earned the top spot going into the weekend.

The South Korean, who won the first two majors of the LPGA season in the Kraft Nabisco Championship and the Wegmans LPGA Championship, shot 68 to get to 9 under. Park ...

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