Fitting

Subscribe

April 7, 2012 | 7:08 a.m.

Meet the Enso

James Achenbach
The Enso, in action.
The Enso, in action.

VISTA, Calif. – Golf club fitting has come a long, long way from the days of trial and error.

In the old days golfers might try a friend’s club. Or perhaps hit a beat-up demo club from a shop. Or maybe buy a club without even hitting it first.

The whole process was distinctly unscientific and unrewarding.

Enter launch monitors and sophisticated swing analyzers. Finally golfers were able to compare clubs with a measure of precision.

Today’s launch monitors are elaborate and complex. They are a major fitting tool for golfers of all levels and abilities.

So what is ...

Click here to continue reading

September 29, 2011 | 11:19 a.m.

Find the gap

James Achenbach
Idea Tech V3 forged set
Idea Tech V3 forged set

Pay attention to proper gapping between clubs. And pay attention to proper lie angle.

Those are among the messages of Michael Vrska, director of product development for Adams Golf.

Adams has earned a reputation for developing innovative mixed sets that contain irons and hybrids. Tim Reed, vice president of research & development, is the main man in the company’s creative design efforts. Vrska is one of Reed’s lieutenants, frequently serving as a spokesman during the introduction of Adams clubs.

The newest mixed set from Adams is the Idea Tech V3 hybrid irons. There are two versions – the Forged Set ...

Click here to continue reading

Categories: For Your Game, Fitting
September 7, 2011 | 11:49 a.m.

Launch away

James Achenbach
Nike club-fitter Rob Burbick
Nike club-fitter Rob Burbick

Rob Burbick can be found in Nike Golf’s PGA Tour van, where he helps some of the world’s top golfers find the right equipment.

If there is one lesson that translates from players on the PGA Tour to ordinary golfers, Burbick believes it is this: All golfers should take advantage of a launch monitor when getting fit for golf clubs.

“You need to match your golf clubs to your ball speed,” he said. “The slower your ball speed, the more spin and higher launch you need.”

Some amateurs don’t achieve maximum distance because they don’t use ...

Click here to continue reading

September 3, 2011 | 9:37 a.m.

Building the belly

Alex Miceli
The length of the belly putter can vary, here the tour van works on one at 44 inches.
The length of the belly putter can vary, here the tour van works on one at 44 inches.

With belly putters becoming all the rage on the PGA Tour, I was wondering how the equipment manufacturers were fitting players.

Not everyone is like Adam Scott, who goes to a golf shop and picks out a putter without a fitting and becomes successful.

Especially since a belly putter is so different than conventional models.

Larry Silveira, a putter expert for Titleist's Scotty Cameron putters, took me through how he fits a player for a belly putter. Though it's not rocket science, it isn't an easy process, either.

First, Silveira has the player grab the shaft of ...

Click here to continue reading

August 9, 2011 | 10:50 a.m.

'It's not so simple'

James Achenbach
One tip on ball fitting: Stick with one ball. Golfers who frequently switch from one kind of ball to another are asking for trouble. “If you don’t know how your ball will spin and react around the green, you are adding shots to your score."
One tip on ball fitting: Stick with one ball. Golfers who frequently switch from one kind of ball to another are asking for trouble. “If you don’t know how your ball will spin and react around the green, you are adding shots to your score."

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. - Choosing a golf ball may appear to be simple. It isn’t.

The subject of ball fitting is so important to Titleist that the company has launched a major campaign to educate golfers.

“For golfers of all abilities, they have to focus on the fact that the golf ball is used for every shot in a round,” said Mary Lou Bohn, vice president of Titleist golf ball marketing and communications. “Most players don’t want tradeoffs. They want a ball that performs well on long shots, on short shots, on all shots.

“It’s not so ...

Click here to continue reading

July 21, 2011 | 11:18 a.m.

Haney's tips

James Achenbach
Hank Haney
Hank Haney

On June 6, TaylorMade announced it had signed instructor Hank Haney to an endorsement contract.

“Haney will represent the TaylorMade brand by playing and teaching with TaylorMade equipment, wearing the TaylorMade logo on his headwear and shirt sleeve and using a TaylorMade staff bag,” the announcement said.

Nothing unusual there.

However, on June 7, Haney talked with Golfweek about his new priority – playing the game, rather than teaching pros.

“I am playing a lot of golf,” Haney said, “and I intend to continue playing as much as I can. I just love to play golf. When I had the opportunity ...

Click here to continue reading

July 15, 2011 | 5:39 a.m.

Finding your putter

James Achenbach
Bob Charles has advice to everyone searching for a putter: "...find a putter that feels right and keep using it. Over a period of time, you can develop the proper touch - something you can depend on."
Bob Charles has advice to everyone searching for a putter: "...find a putter that feels right and keep using it. Over a period of time, you can develop the proper touch - something you can depend on."

Machrihanish, Scotland - It seemed a long way to go for a tip on golf club selection, but the sun was shining, the wind was down, and it was a glorious day in western Scotland.

The golf tip, coming from a major champion, was just a bonus.

Walking briskly around the corner of the clubhouse at Machrihanish Golf Club, there he was, Bob Charles, the 1963 British Open champion. Thrown over his shoulder was a carry golf bag.

“Let’s go,” he said, quietly. “Let’s make some birdies.”

Charles, 74 at the time, would carry that bag for 18 holes ...

Click here to continue reading

July 12, 2011 | 6:21 p.m.

Know your clubs

James Achenbach
Lynn Griffin believes whatever your favorite golf club may be, however complicated the specs may be, make sure you have it duplicated.
Lynn Griffin believes whatever your favorite golf club may be, however complicated the specs may be, make sure you have it duplicated.

Columbia, S.C. - Here’s a 21st-century concept: Whatever your favorite golf club may be, however complicated the specs may be, make sure you have it duplicated.

This is one of the specialities of Doc Griffin Golf in Columbia, S.C., and it makes sense with today’s hectic lifestyles.

If your nearest and dearest club is lost, stolen or damaged, you have a replacement. Furthermore, while obtaining a duplicate club, you also are given a list of its exact specifications.

Knowing for sure what you are swinging can help in the purchase of other clubs. Knowledge about your golf ...

Click here to continue reading

Categories: For Your Game, Fitting
July 7, 2011 | 10:55 a.m.

A new theory

James Achenbach
Matt Killen, 26, is a proponent of the high-lofted wedge. Here he works with Kenny Perry (left).
Matt Killen, 26, is a proponent of the high-lofted wedge. Here he works with Kenny Perry (left).

At 26, Matt Killen already lists Kenny Perry, J.B. Holmes and several other touring pros among his students. Obviously, Killen is talented. He also is unafraid to question conventional wisdom or formulate his own theories.

Killen’s analysis of wedges might be called revolutionary, because he is an outspoken advocate of high-lofted wedges for skilled players. His advice flies in the face of conventional wisdom.

“Get the ball on the ground and let it run,” we are told of chip shots. “Lower is more reliable than higher.”

To this day some older golfers such as Tom Watson limit their ...

Click here to continue reading

July 5, 2011 | 6 a.m.

A big choice

James Achenbach
Tom Wishon (www.wishongolf.com) is focusing on a theory that also can be called progressive swingweighting. In general, the swingweight increases as the irons grow shorter (i.e., more head feel in the short irons and wedges).
Tom Wishon (www.wishongolf.com) is focusing on a theory that also can be called progressive swingweighting. In general, the swingweight increases as the irons grow shorter (i.e., more head feel in the short irons and wedges).

Finding the perfect 3-wood may be the most difficult equipment assignment in golf.

The biggest reason is that 3-woods are expected to perform double duty. They often are used on tee shots, and they frequently are used off the turf.

Designing a club to perform both these functions can be devilishly difficult. Having the ability to hit both kinds of shots is, of course, another heavyweight challenge.

Which explains why Tom Wishon, an acclaimed and outspoken golf club designer, says that sometimes the best option for a 3-wood is to go without one.

“Golfers should not automatically think No. 3 ...

Click here to continue reading

June 27, 2011 | 5:31 p.m.

Miller time

James Achenbach
Johnny Miller tees off on one during the Champions for Change Golf Challenge at Harbor Shores Golf Club in Benton Harbor, Mich., on Tuesday Aug. 10, 2010.
Johnny Miller tees off on one during the Champions for Change Golf Challenge at Harbor Shores Golf Club in Benton Harbor, Mich., on Tuesday Aug. 10, 2010.

In the mid 1970s, Johnny Miller often was called the best ballstriker in the world. He won the 1973 U.S. Open and 1976 British Open.

At the time, Miller had strong opinions about golf equipment. He still does. Most golfers, especially seniors, will find his observations interesting if not insightful.

“When you get older, get a club with a lower kickpoint,” he said. “That will help you get the ball up in the air. You want to keep your height (trajectory) as much as you can. That’s very important.

“Most senior golfers shouldn’t carry anything lower than ...

Click here to continue reading

June 23, 2011 | 12:48 p.m.

Driver debate

James Achenbach
The Bobby Jones Superlight.
The Bobby Jones Superlight.

There are two opposing schools of thought on driver length. One maintains that drivers should be shorter for accuracy, the other says drivers should be longer for distance.

Standard length for modern drivers with graphite shafts has settled at 45 inches.

The average length of drivers on the PGA Tour appears to be slightly shorter than 45 inches, with many pros playing drivers in the 44.25- to 44.5-inch range.

Touting more distance, some golf club manufacturers sell drivers that are longer – a few at 45.5 inches, a few more at 46 inches. Bobby Jones Golf even has ...

Click here to continue reading

June 19, 2011 | 5:33 p.m.

Scientific approach

James Achenbach
Bob Vokey splits his time these days between Titleist’s California research and development facility and various professional tours around the world. And often during his travels, especially to the Far East, he’s revered as a golf icon. Much like his colleague Scotty Cameron, Titleist’s putter designer, Vokey draws huge crowds of ordinary golfers and golf fans seeking his wedge wisdom.
Bob Vokey splits his time these days between Titleist’s California research and development facility and various professional tours around the world. And often during his travels, especially to the Far East, he’s revered as a golf icon. Much like his colleague Scotty Cameron, Titleist’s putter designer, Vokey draws huge crowds of ordinary golfers and golf fans seeking his wedge wisdom.

For decades Bob Vokey constructed and repaired golf clubs for the best golfers in Southern California. Since 1997 his name has been synonymous with wedges from Titleist.

Vokey splits his time these days between Titleist’s California research and development facility and various professional tours around the world. And often during his travels, especially to the Far East, he’s revered as a golf icon. Much like his colleague Scotty Cameron, Titleist’s putter designer, Vokey draws huge crowds of ordinary golfers and golf fans seeking his wedge wisdom.

Vokey’s name is on all Titleist wedges. In 2010, Titleist ...

Click here to continue reading

June 19, 2011 | 5:05 p.m.

Shaft matching

James Achenbach
Tom Wishon (www.wishongolf.com) is focusing on a theory that also can be called progressive swingweighting. In general, the swingweight increases as the irons grow shorter (i.e., more head feel in the short irons and wedges).
Tom Wishon (www.wishongolf.com) is focusing on a theory that also can be called progressive swingweighting. In general, the swingweight increases as the irons grow shorter (i.e., more head feel in the short irons and wedges).

We hear variations of this theme all the time: “The USGA has introduced so many rules and regulations that golf companies no longer can be innovators.”

It isn’t true. Over the past decade or so, golf club manufacturers have hired a multitude of brilliant scientists and engineers whose mission is innovation.

With all this brainpower in golf, will swingweight become a thing of the past?

Perhaps. Over the history of golf, improvements in golf equipment at times have started with tiny clubmakers and spread throughout the industry. In today’s golf environment, swingweight is increasingly under fire from a ...

Click here to continue reading

June 19, 2011 | 4:19 p.m.

Yes, it is important

James Achenbach
TaylorMade is about to dramatically expand its network of Performance Labs, with a goal of opening 24 facilities with company-approved fitters in the next two years.
TaylorMade is about to dramatically expand its network of Performance Labs, with a goal of opening 24 facilities with company-approved fitters in the next two years.

Why should all golfers be professionally fit for their golf clubs?

Because fitting is the No. 1 fundamental for providing consistency throughout a set of clubs.

Some golfers produce a workable set of clubs through mixing and matching. At the expense of considerable time and perseverance, they hit many different clubs, always looking for a certain feel or trajectory.

Modern fitting is much easier and more effective. With today’s technology, including sophisticated launch monitors that track and measure a ball throughout its flight, it is possible to identify a favorite club and dynamically match it with every other club ...

Click here to continue reading

Previous

  • PGA
  • CHMP
  • WEB
[[PGAtourn]] Full Leaderboard >
Prev
  • [[player._CurPos]]
  • [[player._Lname]], [[player._Fname]]
  • [[player._TournParRel]]
  • [[player._Thru]]
Next
[[CHMPtourn]] Full Leaderboard >
Prev
  • [[player._CurPos]]
  • [[player._Lname]], [[player._Fname]]
  • [[player._TournParRel]]
  • [[player._Thru]]
Next
[[NWIDtourn]] Full Leaderboard >
Prev
  • [[player._CurPos]]
  • [[player._Lname]], [[player._Fname]]
  • [[player._TournParRel]]
  • [[player._Thru]]
Next