Fitting

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June 30, 2006 | 1:50 p.m.

Loft and lie

James Achenbach
Ed Mitchell works in the club repair room during the final round of the 2009 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on April 12, 2009 in Augusta, Georgia.
Ed Mitchell works in the club repair room during the final round of the 2009 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on April 12, 2009 in Augusta, Georgia.

Ed Mitchell’s loft and lie machines seem to be everywhere – in tour vans, golf repair shops, club manufacturing facilities and in the homes of club fanatics – and Mitchell has emerged as an extremely influential voice in the realm of club fitting.

A loft and lie machine is used to alter the loft or lie of irons, hybrids and metalwoods. Adjusting the loft or lie of putters requires a different machine, and Mitchell Golf in Dayton, Ohio, sells one of those as well.

Lofts and lies, if set correctly, form a reliable progression – creating consistent distance gaps between clubs and ...

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September 7, 2005 | 4:55 p.m.

2005: For Your Game - Clubfitting of tomorrow

James Achenbach

What is the future of clubfitting?

Benoit Vincent, TaylorMade’s chief technical officer, has been at the forefront of modern clubfitting. He was instrumental in the development of the MATT system (Motion Analysis Technology by TaylorMade), which is an innovative fitting and teaching tool.

Using MATT, golfers view 3-D images of their swings and compare them with swings of touring professionals.

“We are trying to export that (MATT) to the real world,” Vincent said, “but we’re facing the (high) cost of such a piece of equipment. It requires several cameras, as well as highly sophisticated hardware and software.”

Vincent ...

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Categories: For Your Game, Fitting
James Achenbach

Most golfers know about the importance of fitting. Properly fit golf clubs can help a golfer hit the ball straighter, higher and even longer.

However, golfers don’t necessarily know where to go for a professional fitting. Here is a rundown of some available options:

Most major golf companies can recommend certified clubfitters for their clubs. Ping has about 3,000 certified clubfitters. Titleist has more than 2,500. All manufacturers maintain up-to-date lists of certified fitters.

Finding a qualified fitter can be the initial step in answering two questions: One, are a golfer’s current clubs a good fit ...

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Categories: For Your Game, Fitting
August 28, 2004 | 10:43 a.m.

Fit to be tied

Golf customization is in, and that means club fitting is all the rage. I have gone through the process with a few major equipment makers, mostly in the line of duty as a golf writer, and watched dozens of other recreational players do the same. There are obvious benefits to a set of woods and irons made to your exacting specifications, but they do not always outweigh the occasional silliness of the ordeal.

Let’s start with what is perhaps the greatest problem with a proper club fitting, which is the use of video to observe and understand a golfer ...

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Categories: For Your Game, Fitting

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