Golfweek’s Best Tour Courses

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April 21, 2011 | 10:14 a.m.

Open for play

Bradley S. Klein
No. 5 Carnoustie in Scotland.
No. 5 Carnoustie in Scotland.

Golfweek’s Best: Tour Courses You Can Play (2010-11)

The world’s best players might play a game with which we recreational amateurs are unfamiliar, but they often play courses with which we’re quite familiar.

Our annual list of Golfweek’s Best Tour Courses You Can Play reveals that far from being elitist undertakings, the pro circuits – PGA Tour, Champions Tour, Nationwide Tour and LPGA – are surprisingly public and accessible 
in terms of venues.

Of the 50 layouts highlighted on our list, 26 are regular PGA Tour stops – starting with No. 1 on the roster, Pebble Beach Golf Links ...

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Golfweek Staff
No. 1 Pebble Beach.
No. 1 Pebble Beach.

1. Pebble Beach

PGA / U.S. Open, AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, Pebble Beach, Calif.

8.77


2. St. Andrews (Old)

PGA / British Open, St. Andrews, Scotland

8.75


3. Whistling Straits (Straits)

PGA / PGA Championship, Kohler, Wis.

8.75


4. Royal St. George’s

PGA / British Open, Sandwich, England

8.19


5. Carnoustie (Championship)

Champions / Senior British; LPGA / Women’s British, Carnoustie, Scotland

7.92


6. Spyglass Hill

PGA / AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, Pebble Beach, Calif.

7.85


7. Cap Cana (Punta Espada)

Champions / Cap Cana Championship, Cap Cana, Dominican Republic

7.81


8. TPC Sawgrass ...

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April 22, 2010 | 10:22 a.m.

Major venues

Martin Kaufmann
No. 7 at Pebble Beach, No. 1 on Golfweek's Best Tour Courses You Can Play (2009-10)
No. 7 at Pebble Beach, No. 1 on Golfweek's Best Tour Courses You Can Play (2009-10)


• 2009-10 Golfweek's Best Tour Courses You Can Play



If there were any question about the quality of the courses golf’s ruling bodies are choosing to host major championships, it would be answered by the 2009-10 Golfweek’s Best Tour Courses You Can Play list.

Major-championship sites occupy the top five spots on the list, and the top three – Pebble Beach, St. Andrews (Old Course) and Whistling Straits (Straits Course) – will host the PGA Tour’s next three majors. This provides even more fodder for those who have said that the Tour has never played its four majors on ...

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April 22, 2010 | midnight

2009-10 Golfweek’s Best Tour Courses

Categories: Tour Courses
May 8, 2009 | 1:49 p.m.

2009 Golfweek’s Best Tour Courses

Categories: Tour Courses
September 7, 2006 | 12:59 p.m.

2006: Still waiting to see the true Medinah

Alex Miceli

Medinah, Ill.

Medinah Country Club had hosted five major championships before last week’s PGA Championship – the 1939 Western Open, the 1949, 1975 and 1990 U.S. Opens, and the 1999 PGA. But starting with the 1990 U.S. Open, Medinah has had a setup problem that has called into question the integrity of the course for majors.

In 1990, the course was in prime condition, hard and fast, but P.J. Boatwright, the director of rules and competition for the U.S. Golf Association, decided to change the setup after players complained about the course’s difficulty. On the ...

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Categories: Tour Courses
July 7, 2006 | 11:13 a.m.

2006: Medinah could yield scoring ambush

Bradley S. Klein

By Bradley S. Klein

Medinah, Ill.

For those who think narrow, tree-lined fairways are the paradigm of good course design, Medinah Country Club’s No. 3 course is an icon. For others who are keen on strategic variety and a nuanced aesthetic of vistas and playing textures, there is no more boring example of architecture in America than this long parkland layout in suburban Chicago.

For the PGA Championship, Aug. 17-20, Medinah certainly will be in better shape than it was during the 1999 PGA, when searing heat and humidity baked the greens to a crisp. Superintendent Tom Lively, CGCS ...

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Categories: Tour Courses
June 30, 2006 | 11:48 a.m.

2006: Island hopping

The perilous par-3 island 17th at TPC Sawgrass, listed somewhat skimpily at 137 yards and playing as short as 123 yards in the third round, took its usual toll at The Players.

It may look like a poodle, but it bites like a pit bull.

Forty-nine players dumped a total of 51 balls into the water from either the tee or the drop area over four rounds. Joey Sindelar and Steve Lowery hit two balls apiece into the drink in Round 3. The second-round total was listed at 16, though Daniel Chopra actually chipped a ball into the water from ...

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Categories: Tour Courses
October 3, 2004 | 12:33 p.m.

2004: Match-play whimsy can be wonderful

Bradley S. Klein

Great golf course architecture owes an unacknowledged debt to match play.

Yet those players today who expect courses to be “fair” are, by contrast, rooted in a stroke-play mentality that makes distinctive architecture virtually impossible to achieve.

Between 1916 and 1933, three of the five most important championships in golf – the PGA Championship, U.S. Amateur and British Amateur – had a match-play format. (The U.S. Open and British Open were stroke play.) Match play dominated amateur golf, and amateur golf dominated the country and the world.

This also was the era in which the greatest visionaries in golf architecture ...

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