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Nick Masuda
Rory McIlroy prepares for the Masters at Augusta National in 2014, with his first-round tee time two days away.
Rory McIlroy prepares for the Masters at Augusta National in 2014, with his first-round tee time two days away.

AUGUSTA, Ga. – There will be plenty of intrigue both the morning and afternoon sessions at the 78th Masters, while amateur Matthew Fitzpatrick will get an up-close look at the pressures of defending a major title.

Here are some key pairings for the second round of the Masters:

1:48 p.m.: Adam Scott, Jason Dufner, Matthew Fitzpatrick

Wow, talk about trial by fire. Scott won the 2013 Masters and could take over as World No. 1 this week. Jason Dufner is as calm as they come and is the defending PGA Championship champ. And while Fitzpatrick is the reigning U ...

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Jim McCabe
Yep, just like Tiger Woods, the finalists of the inaugural Drive, Chip and Putt competition will take to the practice green by the Augusta National clubhouse in front of a crowd.
Yep, just like Tiger Woods, the finalists of the inaugural Drive, Chip and Putt competition will take to the practice green by the Augusta National clubhouse in front of a crowd.

It would be a dream moment that almost every golfer is born with, though precious few get to realize. Mark O’Meara accomplished it, but not until his 15th try and at the age of 41. Phil Mickelson? He did it, too, but he was 33 and in his 12th attempt.

Akshay Bhatia and Zell Wilson? They may pull it off in their first attempts – at 12 and 9, respectively.

We’re talking a winning putt at the 18th hole on an April Sunday at Augusta National Golf Club.

Now if you have no trouble recalling O’Meara’s right-to-left ...

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Adam Scott receives a thumbs-up from Angel Cabrera after sinking a birdie putt to win the 2013 Masters.
Adam Scott receives a thumbs-up from Angel Cabrera after sinking a birdie putt to win the 2013 Masters.

— Angel Cabrera’s thumbs-up to Adam Scott was a highly-visible display of sportsmanship on the second hole of their Masters playoff. It may have been less important than a private moment they had shared more than three years earlier.

As Scott, in the midst of a prolonged slump, left the 2009 Presidents Cup, Cabrera pulled him aside and said, “You’re a great, great player.” Scott arrived at San Francisco’s Harding Park as the world’s 65th-ranked player. He went 1-4; Scott and Cabrera lost, 2 down, to Anthony Kim and Jim Furyk. Yet Cabrera's words ...

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James Achenbach
Tianlang Guan after his final round at the 2013 Masters.
Tianlang Guan after his final round at the 2013 Masters.

AUGUSTA, Ga. -- The Masters is over. I don’t know if I can stand it, returning to real life. And I’m not the only one.

The Not-Quite-A-Cuss-Word Award: Sandy Lyle, reflecting on his return to the real life on the Champions Tour, almost sounded depressed. “Yes, I’m back to the old farts next week, on a frigging long golf course as well (TPC Sugarloaf in Duluth, Ga.),” he said apprehensively. Lyle, by the way, shot 297 at the Masters at the age of 55.

The No-Doubles Award: 14-year-old Tianlang Guan of China did not make a double bogey ...

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April 14, 2013 | 10:45 p.m.

Quick quotes: Cabrera, Day, Tiger, more

Golfweek Staff
Angel Cabrera during the playoff at the 2013 Masters.
Angel Cabrera during the playoff at the 2013 Masters.

Those who came close to winning the Masters spoke candidly after their rounds. Here's a sampling of their words after Sunday's final round at Augusta National:

• • •

ANGEL CABRERA

Asked if he felt unlucky when close putts didn't fall: Yeah, that's golf. Golf gives and takes. So yeah, sometimes you make those putts, sometimes you just miss them. But that's golf.

Asked if his experience as a Masters champion helped Sunday: Yeah, I had a lot of peace of mind and I was very confident. I knew that it depended on me. I knew ...

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Golfweek Staff
Adam Scott after winning the 2013 Masters in a playoff.
Adam Scott after winning the 2013 Masters in a playoff.

— Masters official Craig Heatley, a New Zealander, conducted the main post-round interview for the media with 2013 Masters champion Adam Scott, which also included questions from reporters on hand:

Ladies and gentlemen, it's my distinct pleasure to welcome our 2013 Masters Champion from Australia, Adam Scott. When I heard the roar down on 10, a second later I heard about 30 million people in Australia and New Zealand all cheering, as well, I can't even describe the pleasure that it gives me to welcome and congratulate you, Adam, on an awesome performance.

ADAM SCOTT: With that ...

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Golfweek Staff
Adam Scott and Angel Cabrera hug at the conclusion of Scott's playoff win in the 2013 Masters.
Adam Scott and Angel Cabrera hug at the conclusion of Scott's playoff win in the 2013 Masters.

Almost as quickly as Angel Cabrera was doling out a hug on the 10th green, pro and top amateur golfers were quick to line up their congratulatory posts on social media for new Masters champ Adam Scott, who broke through for his first major championship. Here's a sampling from their Twitter accounts:

Brandt Snedeker, @BrandtSnedeker: Humbled by all the support I received this week.. My time will come.. Congrats to a worthy champ.. Adam deserved today..

Trevor Immelman, @TrevorImmelman: Really happy for Scotty, one of my longest standing friends on tour. A true champion and gentleman.... One for our ...

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Golfweek Staff
Rory McIlroy during the final round of the 2013 Masters.
Rory McIlroy during the final round of the 2013 Masters.

— The word about Augusta early Sunday morning was that hole locations were there for the taking – and amid favorable conditions at that.

Rory McIlroy certainly took advantage, closing out an otherwise disappointing Masters with a 69, good for 2 over for the week. Much of McIlroy's troubles stemmed from a 79 in Saturday's third round.

". . . I didn't feel like I played too differently today than I did yesterday, but yet the score is 10 shots lower," McIlroy said. "It's just the way it is on this golf course. If you get on the wrong ...

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Golfweek Staff
Bubba Watson during the final round of the 2013 Masters.
Bubba Watson during the final round of the 2013 Masters.

— Bubba Watson, like any PGA Tour golfer, can't be competitive every week – but he's almost always entertaining. After closing the defense of his Masters championship with a 77 to finish the week at 7 over, Watson had some typically candid remarks.

For one thing, he reiterated that he wasn't out to stage a defense of his title – just win – and that made things simpler.

"Oh, it's really easy, because no matter what, you're playing the following year. So when you look at it, it was a blast. Like I said, though, my mindset ...

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Beth Ann Nichols
Tianlang Guan after his final round at the 2013 Masters.
Tianlang Guan after his final round at the 2013 Masters.

— Tianlang Guan walked off the 18th hole and posed for a photograph with Billy Payne, chairman of Augusta National Golf Club and Peter Dawson, secretary of the R&A. It was a fitting way to end a heady week for Guan, who proved the Asia-Pacific Amateur initiative to be worthwhile with his gutsy performance.

Guan, 14, became the youngest player to ever make the cut at the Masters and the youngest to win low-amateur honors. Three of the four Asia-Pacific champions have now made the cut here.

“It’s actually the most difficult course in the world,” said Guan, when asked if he felt Augusta National got easier for him as the week went on. Guan shot 73-75-77-75 to finish 12 over. He never made worse than bogey. He also never had a three-putt. He headed to the clubhouse leading the field in putting.

Before Guan made history here at the Masters, the family planned to head back to China. Now that invitations to play have started coming in, however, his schedule is uncertain. Guan wouldn’t elaborate on his tournament options.

When asked about his long-term plans on turning professional, Guan said there’s no need to rush.

“I’ve not decided yet,” he said. “But it won't be too early because there's still a lot of things to learn to improve.”

Guan said earlier in the week that he brought homework with him to Augusta. When asked if he was able to keep up with it, he said “probably tonight,” and then smiled.

He got the whole press room laughing when a reporter asked “What classes do you take?”

“(In) China, you didn't take class; they give you the class,” he said. “So there's a lot.”

As for his shot of the week, Guan gave the nod to the 60-foot par putt he drained on No. 18 Saturday, though he had several impressive performances on 18. On Sunday, the crowd gave him a standing ovation as he walked off the green. He tossed his ball into the gallery.

The next time Guan tees it ...

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Graeme McDowell during the 2012 Ryder Cup.
Graeme McDowell during the 2012 Ryder Cup.

The Masters had Twitter and other social-media sites aflame Saturday morning -- typically a time when all is relatively quiet at Augusta National, save perhaps for someone going low on the front nine with an early time.

Sunday provided a return to a more conventional weekend-morning feel. At the forefront were a couple of players' posts on Twitter about the final-round hole locations:

Graeme McDowell, @Graeme_McDowell: "Looking at today's pins there is a definite 65/66 out there so you can look as far down the leaderboard as -2 perhaps"

Nathan Smith, @DStick23: "They r gonna let them go today ...

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Adam Schupak
Matt Kuchar, of the United States, hits his tee shot on the fourth hole during the third round of the Masters.
Matt Kuchar, of the United States, hits his tee shot on the fourth hole during the third round of the Masters.

— Matt Kuchar smiles at the memories of his first trip to the Masters 15 years ago. You know, the Kuchar smile. It’s as wide as the Grand Canyon.

Back then, he was an amateur sensation here in 1998. He won the hearts of the patrons with a Saturday 68 and a 21st place finish.

Memories, he has a few, such as gripping tightly to the railing and descending the steep, narrow staircase of the Crow’s Nest, the famed attic of the Augusta National clubhouse where generations of amateur competitors have slept.

“You come out of a ...

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Cassie Stein
Tiger Woods prepares among his peers for the third round of the 2013 Masters.
Tiger Woods prepares among his peers for the third round of the 2013 Masters.

The drop heard 'round the world.

Tiger Woods was given a two-stroke penalty Saturday morning after an illegal drop on No. 15 during the second round of the Masters on Friday.

People have multiple opinions on the situation and whether Augusta National made the right decision in giving him a two-shot penalty rather than disqualifying him.

• • •

Before Tiger got to Augusta National for Saturday’s third round, he took to Twitter:

Tiger Woods @TigerWoods

At hole #15, I took a drop that I thought was correct and in accordance with the rules. I was unaware at that time I had ...

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Tiger Woods drops on No. 15 at Augusta National during the second round of the 2013 Masters. A day later, he was assessed a two-stroke penalty for an improper drop.
Tiger Woods drops on No. 15 at Augusta National during the second round of the 2013 Masters. A day later, he was assessed a two-stroke penalty for an improper drop.

— Tiger Woods' two-shot penalty dropped him five shots behind 36-hole leader Jason Day. Woods fell from a tie for seventh to a tie for 19th; his second-round 71 was turned into a 73.

Woods trailed Day by three shots before the penalty. "He can make that up in nine holes,” Day said Friday evening. Now the deficit is even greater for Woods, the pre-tournament favorite after winning three times in 2013, including his previous two starts before the Masters.

A win by Woods this week would indeed be considered controversial by those who believe he should have been ...

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Beth Ann Nichols
Cal's Michael Weaver
Cal's Michael Weaver

— Michael Weaver never imagined that his biggest competition for low amateur at the Masters would be 14-year-old Tianlang Guan. Much less that Guan would be the only amateur to make the cut.

“People questioned whether or not the club was doing the right thing inviting a 14-year-old,” Weaver said. “Those people are kind of eating crow a little bit.”

For the Cal junior and the rest of the amateur players, it was a tough 36 holes. Weaver, runner-up at last year’s U.S. Amateur, was disappointed in his play on the par 5s. He bogeyed the eighth ...

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