Photos for October 23, 2011

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Stephanie Meadow watches a shot during the SEC/Pac-12 Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Luke Donald reacts after sinking a birdie putt on the 15th hole during the final round of the Children's Miracle Network Classic. Firing a final-round 64, Donald went on to win by two, clinching the PGA Tour money title.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Fans show their love for Yani Tseng during the final round. Tseng won by five strokes.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Luke Donald makes a birdie putt on the second hole during the final round of the Children's Miracle Network Hospitals Classic.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Vice President of Taiwan, Vincent Siew, waves to the crowd during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Sergio Garcia plays a shot during the final round of the Castello Masters Costa Azahar at the Club de Campo del Mediterraneo.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The Sunrise Golf and Country Club security tries to keep fans who rushed the fairway at No. 18 from going any further during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng gets a big hug from her 93-year-old grandma, Cheng-chu Yang, on her way to accepting the trophy from the 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The leaderboard behind the 18th green during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng nearly holes out her second shot at No. 18 during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng , center in pink, makes her way through the crowds during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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This was how the area looked before Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw put their magic touch on the area. How many more holes are available in the remaining forest? We may find out as the years go on.

Published on October 23, 2011

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From the right side of the 13th fairway an existing and evolving bunker are visible. Note how the green is designed in sections, providing many differing hole locations and a different experience each time you tee it up.

Published on October 23, 2011

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From this view of the 13th green, the slight undulation of the green from back to front is visible as well as the difficulties if the hole location when positioned near the left side of the green. Playing the bounce will be required in many cases.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Looking down, the 110-yard 13th and final hole requires precision. With bunkering short and left and chipping and runoff areas all around, the 13th hole is a perfect finishing hole.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Fairly wide open, looking back at the 12th tee, the penultimate hole is wide open and provides for running the ball into the green in windy conditions.

Published on October 23, 2011

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With the Bandon Trails clubhouse in the background, you know you're near the end of one of the best rides at Bandon Dunes. With everything visible off the tee, the 12th is a good transition to the 13th hole.

Published on October 23, 2011

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With the Pacific Ocean in your rearview mirror the 12th hole is maybe the least adventurous. Surrounded by mounds and sitting in the valley, the 12th hole can cause problems, but not likely.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The front of the green on No. 11 at Bandon Dunes.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Not much to say about this tee shot at the 11th. At 152 yards and the left side of the green falling off into the high grasses of Bandon Dunes, the safe route is the right side, but judging the distance and the wind, hitting any part of the green may be difficult.

Published on October 23, 2011

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From the back, the green looks like a bowl, but looking from the front of the 7th green, it looks completely different. The red flag to the left is the eighth hole.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Note the sloped green on the 11th that is not visible from the tee. Of course long is a problem with the large mound in the background, leaving the right side the safest route, but with the slope and mounding, getting up and down will be difficult.

Published on October 23, 2011

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A view of the left side of the green, its clear how quickly the green falls off at No. 10. In the background, is the 17th hole of the Bandon Dunes course.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Note the sloped green on the 11th that is not visible from the tee. Of course long is a problem with the large mound in the background, leaving the right side the safest route, but with the slope and mounding, getting up and down will be difficult.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The 10th hole shares a very large teeing area with the seventh hole and marks the unfortunate return back to civilization. The tee shot is a stunner, to an elevated green, hidden by natural mounding and a bunker, at 120 yards it seems so easy.

Published on October 23, 2011

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If it wasn’t hard enough to negotiate the tee shot at No. 10, now you have a green, that unlike the ninth, is not flat and has enough undulation to make three-putting a real possibility. Getting out of the 10th with a par will be all you can ask for. Note that the views of the Pacific will be few and far between after the 10th.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Obviously short of the 10th hole is not the best place to be. Looking from this, view the green is still not visible and any chip will need to be perfect to get out with a par.

Published on October 23, 2011

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An elevated tee on No. 9 provides a great look at the Pacific Ocean and a relatively easy shot compared to some at The Preserve. Short poses no problem getting up and down.

Published on October 23, 2011

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An elevated tee on No. 9 provides a great look at the Pacific Ocean and a relatively easy shot compared to some at The Preserve. Short poses no problem getting up and down.

Published on October 23, 2011

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With possibly the best look of the Pacific Ocean in the background, the ninth hole is simple, yet with the wind always playing tricks, getting close to the hole may be a challenge on this relatively flat green.

Published on October 23, 2011

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At only 78 yards, the fact that the tee shot on No. 8 is blind seems fair, but don’t be fooled by the length. In the world of seeing a green off the tee, many will find this tee shot difficult. Long is much better than short.

Published on October 23, 2011

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A truly blind look even from 20 yards away, long will always be the better play on No. 8.

Published on October 23, 2011

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A truly blind look even from 20 yards away, long will always be the better play on No. 8.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Hidden and large, this view is only for those that have missed the green short or left. The view of the 8th green from the tee is completely different and reveals nothing of what the hole shows from here.

Published on October 23, 2011

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With a tee shot to an elevated green, the seventh is the longest hole at The Preserve at 164 yards. Since the green is hard to see and the hole location difficult to discern, the seventh may turn out to be the most difficult hole of the 13.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The only double green sharing with the fourth hole, the seventh green is relatively flat, but the views are much more impressive looking back to the Pacific Ocean and just to the right - the Bandon Dunes back nine.

Published on October 23, 2011

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When The Preserve was being planned only 12 holes were envisioned, but as construction started Architects Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw found this little gem and the 13th hole was born.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The closest of any holes, the sixth green is a great view of the Pacific Ocean. Also notice the movement on the green near the back on the ocean side.

Published on October 23, 2011

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You can see one of the basic characteristics of The Preserve in this look back to the sixth tee, as it has multiple teeing areas.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The sixth green looks relatively flat, but the right side will dictate the movement on the green that has the Pacific Ocean to its left. Expect almost everything to move toward the ocean.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Ok, can you think of a more spectacular look than the tee shot into the fifth green, with the Pacific Ocean and the Bandon Preserve forest in the foreground? Obviously the tee is elevated, and while finding the green looks easy from the 152-yard back tees, the green is not so benign.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The first plateau-type green makes an appearance at the 5th hole. A relatively large green, putts from the back will be common, as the breezes off the ocean will push the ball to the back of the green.

Published on October 23, 2011

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What seems like a bowl, the tee shot at No. 4 is elevated to a very large green, which is very receptive, but difficult to get the ball close.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The fourth is another with excellent views of the Pacific Ocean, but going long can be a problem, not to mention off-line shots that can bounce in many different directions if not hit perfectly.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The only double green at The Preserve, the fourth and seventh green is also the biggest. As with most of the greens at The Preserve, there is a lot of movement and it is everywhere.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng, center background, keeps shaking hands as security attempts to keep the line moving.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Just 106 yards, the third is the shortest hole at The Preserve. It is also the pathway to the meat of The Preserve.

Published on October 23, 2011

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With few exceptions, the Pacific Ocean is visible from every hole on The Preserve, but it really is part of the feeling of playing the Preserve starting at the third hole.

Published on October 23, 2011

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A relatively flat green, the third hole opens the way to some of the best golf The Preserve has to offer.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng walks up to the 18th tee during Saturday's round.

Published on October 23, 2011

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The front bunker is the defining feature of the second hole and while not visible looking back to the tee, it is very distinctive from the tee and makes short or left a difficult way to the play the second hole.

Published on October 23, 2011

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An elevated tee, the second hole look relatively benign, typical of many true links holes, but looking at the hole from the tee the view is completely different.

Published on October 23, 2011

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A bit elevated, the second green has a lot more bunkering defining the putting surface, and a bunker, as you can see, that could instantly ruin a good round.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Like many holes at The Preserve, links-style bunkers protect the first hole. Looking wind-blown and unkempt, the hazards are one of the significant design features of the 13-hole course. At 138 yards from the back tee, the first hole is a bit down hill and will play a little shorter than its yardage, but with the prevailing wind in your face, the club selection to a large angular green is critical.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Azahara Munoz during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng begins her walk through the fans to the first tee during Saturday's round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng makes birdie at No. 2 during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng watches her tee shot at No. 2 during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Crowds make their way down the ninth fairway during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng, far right, finishes her putt at No. 9 during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Crowds make their way around trying to follow Yani Tseng as she makes the turn during the final round of the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng kisses the trophy after winning the tournament by five strokes at the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng raises her arms in victory after beating the field by five strokes to win the inaugural 2011 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship.

Published on October 23, 2011

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Yani Tseng won her 10th title of the season, this time in front of her home-country fans in Taiwan, clearing the field by five shots.

Published on October 23, 2011

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As you can see the first is a large green running from back to front. You will notice a little movement in the green from left to right, but with pure fescue the green will run very true. Note the mounding on the right side of the green that can be beneficial at times providing a gentle carom to the hole location. But, at the same time, a misplayed tee shot could get caught in the native grasses on the side of mound, leaving a difficult up and down.

Published on October 23, 2011