Is the Americans' drawn-out Ryder Cup captain's picks process too much? Rory McIlroy thinks so

Rory McIlroy

Is the Americans' drawn-out Ryder Cup captain's picks process too much? Rory McIlroy thinks so

PGA Tour

Is the Americans' drawn-out Ryder Cup captain's picks process too much? Rory McIlroy thinks so

By

Come Monday morning when U.S. captain Davis Love III gets around to naming three more picks to his Ryder Cup team, it will be two weeks since the European team was completed.

And then the Americans will need another two weeks before they round out their 12-man team.

Count Rory McIlroy among those who consider that a bit much.

“Yeah, I find that a little strange, and I think people looking in from the outside feel that way, too,” McIlroy said.

He agreed that both teams should do their picks at the same time. Otherwise, McIlroy sees an opening to gain an advantage. “We’ve shown them our cards, so America could (work) with a little more knowledge, (maybe) add a little length.”

Then again, McIlroy conceded that the whole qualifying process changes so frequently that it’s difficult to keep up with it. One solution? “Ideal scenario, you take the 12 best European guys from the world ranking and go from there. Twelve best Europeans, 12 best Americans. Go play.”

For fun, a look at this week’s Official World Golf Ranking would produce an American team that is possibly going to be what shows up at Hazeltine: Dustin Johnson, Jordan Spieth, Bubba Watson, Patrick Reed, Rickie Fowler, Phil Mickelson, Jimmy Walker, Matt Kuchar, Brooks Koepka, J.B. Holmes, Jim Furyk and Brandt Snedeker. (Zach Johnson would be out.)

The European team would have a different complexion, however, because Matt Fitzpatrick, Lee Westwood, Martin Kaymer and Andy Sullivan would be out.

Instead, the top 12 would be McIlroy, Henrik Stenson, Justin Rose, Danny Willett, Sergio Garcia, Russell Knox, Paul Casey, Alex Noren, Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Chris Wood, Shane Lowry and Thomas Pieters.

McIlroy knows it will never come to this, but give the kid an “A’”for simplicity — and for trying to spare us the U.S. passion for dragging out the hype.

Latest

More Golfweek
Home