Deep Dive: Bryson DeChambeau's Cobra equipment

Bryson DeChambeau's Cobra irons

Deep Dive: Bryson DeChambeau's Cobra equipment

Equipment

Deep Dive: Bryson DeChambeau's Cobra equipment

Bryson DeChambeau, the 2015 U.S. Amateur and NCAA champion and now a PGA Tour rookie, takes thoroughness to another level. Range sessions always involve a camera, a laptop and launch monitor. Putting practice requires string, a marker to draw on the grass and lots of golf tees. His goal is to understand exactly what is happening on every swing, remove variables and take a methodical approach to golf.

Golfweek recently talked with DeChambeau and Ben Schomin, Cobra Puma Golf’s senior manager of tour operations, about what makes the 23-year-old’s equipment unique.

DRIVER: Cobra King LTD (10.5 degrees), with Oban Kiyoshi Tour Limited 60X shaft

Schomin said DeChambeau had used the King LTD Pro version of the driver before the Shiners Hospital for Children Open in Las Vegas, where he switched to the standard version of the club.

“The (King LTD Pro) was really good at maximizing distance,” Schomin said, “but he was sacrificing some carry distance. So when we made the change, we went up in loft. He’s still hitting it really far but is now finding a few more fairways.”

Schomin said DeChambeau’s typical drive had about 1,800 to 1,900 rpm of backspin, which is low even by PGA Tour standards. To make those spin numbers work, a player has to hit the ball squarely, bring the clubhead into impact on an upward path and create a high launch angle. DeChambeau could do that, but almost any mis-hit was punished severely because the low spin rate would not keep the ball in the air and not help prevent it from peeling right or left.

“This driver may fly 5 or 10 yards shorter, total, but finding the short grass at 305 instead of hitting it 315 is a great tradeoff,” Schomin said.

 

 

FAIRWAY WOOD: Cobra King LTD (14.5 degrees), with Project X HZRDUS Black 80X shaft

DeChambeau’s lone fairway wood is a 3/4 wood and comes standard with an eight-position adjustable hosel that ranges from 13 to 16 degrees of loft. DeChambeau had played the club in a higher-loft setting but settled back into a traditional 3-wood loft, directly in the middle of the range.

Schomin said DeChambeau tested the club in every setting. The 12.2 sticker on the sole was put there by Schomin after he measured the club’s loft in the lowest adjustable setting; all mass-produced heads are minutely different and built with manufacturing tolerances, so each is hand-measured before it is used by a PGA Tour player.

 

 

IRONS: Cobra King Utility (3), with Project X HZRDUS Black 100X shaft; Cobra King Forged One Length (4-PW), with KBS C-Taper Lite 115X shafts

The hollow-bodied Cobra King Utility iron allows players to adjust the club’s loft, and while DeChambeau’s is set in the 18.5-degree setting, Schomin said the club actually has 19 degrees of loft. He also ground the leading edge to soften it and help the club avoid digging or slowing down in the turf.

“He plays it with a hybrid shaft, but we tested a handful of different shafts. That was a game-changer for him,” Schomin said. “That was big. The other ones were working pretty good, but that combination, for him … immediately he was sold. That was actually the first (Cobra) golf club we put in his bag.”

It’s the other irons in DeChambeau’s bag that get most of the attention. All of DeChambeau’s Cobra Forged One Length irons are 37 ½ inches long, and each has a lie angle of 73 degrees, which is about 3 degrees more upright than many putters.

“One of the main differences in these irons compared to what he was playing before is these are lighter,” Schomin said. “They’re about 10 grams lighter through the set. This is actually our stock, standard-weight set. We tested a heavier set of these in Napa (Calif.), and Bryson didn’t think they felt as good.”

While they are all the same length and have the same lie angle, the irons have different lofts to create distance gaps. His 4-iron has 20 degrees of loft, the 5-iron has 24 degrees and the 6-iron has 29. DeChambeau’s 7-iron has 33 degrees of loft, the 8-iron has 38, the 9-iron has 42 and the pitching wedge has 46.

In the video below, DeChambeau explains what you can expect if you try a set of same-length irons:

DeChambeau has 123-gram JumboMax Tour Series XL grips on all his woods, irons and wedges. He has used the grips since 2011. He said the extremely large grip makes it easier to stabilize the club in his palms, reduces rotation and helps him control the face more easily. The added weight also counterbalances the heads slightly, which he said allows him to increase clubhead speed.

 

WEDGES: Cobra King (50, 55, 60 degrees), with KBS Hi-Rev 135 shafts

As the 2015 U.S. Amateur champion, DeChambeau competed in the Georgia Cup, an annual match-play event the U.S. Amateur champion against the British Amateur champion Romain Langasque, a week before the 2016 Masters. Schomin worked with DeChambeau that week to create a set of Cobra wedges, which proved to be challenging.

“We spent some time on the range at the Golf Club of Georgia, and on the golf course, and I had made some wedges for him,” Schomin said. “There was a lot of work that went into shaping them because they needed to be 280 grams. Well, the standard weight of the lob wedge is 305 grams, so you’re talking about taking 25 grams off a wedge and still have it look good at address and perform!”

 

Schomin removed a lot of material from the back flange, from behind the topline and the perimeter of the head, and from the sole. While the lob wedge has 18 degrees of bounce (which is high), the sole is narrow, allowing DeChambeau to get the leading edge under the ball more easily on a tight lie.

“It worked out pretty well,’ Schomin said. “We were literally on the golf course for five minutes and he said they spun more, he could control the flight more and were great.”

PUTTER: Edel Brick

This putter has been in DeChambeau’s bag since 2014, and he won the first time he put it into play by holing a 9-foot putt on the final hole. He went on to win the NCAA Championship and the U.S. Amateur with it.

“We added a little bit of weight to it to increase the MOI (moment of inertia), which we thought would be beneficial,” DeChambeau said. “It’s torque-balanced, so if you balance it the toe points up, and because it’s on an incline plan it always points square to the plane. One of the things that I wanted to have was a simple shape, simple geometry. There is no cavity in the back, so there are no shadows that are cast on the back of it. This looks the same no matter what the angle is to the sun.”

 

 

WEDGES: Cobra King (50, 55, 60 degrees), with KBS Hi-Rev 135 shafts

As the 2015 U.S. Amateur champion, DeChambeau competed in the Georgia Cup, an annual match-play event that pitted him against British Amateur champion Romain Langasque a week before the 2016 Masters. Schomin worked with DeChambeau that week to create a set of Cobra wedges, which proved to be challenging.

“We spent some time on the range at the Golf Club of Georgia, and on the golf course, and I had made some wedges for him,” Schomin said. “There was a lot of work that went into shaping them, because they needed to be 280 grams. Well, the standard weight of the lob wedge is 305 grams, so you’re talking about taking 25 grams off a wedge and still have it look good at address and perform!”

Schomin removed a lot of material from the back flange, from behind the topline and the perimeter of the head, and from the sole. While the lob wedge has 18 degrees of bounce (which is high), the sole is narrow, allowing DeChambeau to get the leading edge under the ball more easily on a tight lie.

“It worked out pretty well,’ Schomin said. “We were literally on the golf course for five minutes and he said they spun more, he could control the flight more and were great.”

 

 

PUTTER: Edel Brick

This putter has been in DeChambeau’s bag since 2014, and he won the first time he put it into play by holing a 9-foot putt on the final hole. He went on to win the NCAA Championship and the U.S. Amateur with it.

“We added a little bit of weight to it to increase the MOI (moment of inertia), which we thought would be beneficial,” DeChambeau said. “It’s torque-balanced, so if you balance it the toe points up, and because it’s on an incline plan it always points square to the plane. One of the things that I wanted to have was a simple shape, simple geometry. There is no (visible) cavity in the back, so there are no shadows that are cast on the back of it. This looks the same no matter what the angle is to the sun.”

 

 

There is no alignment system on the putter, but there is a small copper-colored dot on the top near the heel that indicates the center of gravity.

BALL: Bridgestone B330S

This three-piece ball is designed for players who have a driver swing speed over 105 mph. This ball spins slightly more than the standard B330.

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