2018 U.S. Open preview: Shinnecock Hills No. 7 video flyover, analysis

SOUTHAMPTON, NY - OCTOBER 04: EDITORS NOTE: Polarising filter used on the camera in this image: The 189 yards par 3, seventh hole "Redan" at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club the host venue for the 2018 US Open Championship on October 4, 2017 in Southampton, New York. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images) David Cannon/Getty Images

2018 U.S. Open preview: Shinnecock Hills No. 7 video flyover, analysis

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2018 U.S. Open preview: Shinnecock Hills No. 7 video flyover, analysis

It’s a tradition here pre-U.S. Open: counting down the holes until Shinnecock Hills hosts a fourth modern-era U.S. Open over its magnificent William Flynn design.

Here is a look at No. 7.

Phil Mickelson said this week that Shinnecock’s 7th is a great par-3 until the USGA gets a hold of it and while he certainly has reason to be bitter–putting off the green Saturday of the 2004 U.S. Open due to faulty setup** and hole location and intentionally having to play to a greenside bunker in Sunday’s final round–the hole is mostly a victim of modern green speeds.

P.J. Boatwright on the 188-yard par-3 prior to the 1986 U.S. Open:

Our written instructions on the preparation of the course say, for this hole, “No changes required.” It is a terrific par-3 hole to a putting green perched on a plateau framed by handsome bunkering work. We think it will ask for a four- or five iron from most players. The green is considerably sloped from right to left; it will be a challenge.

The same yardage will be used this year, though the club of choice figures to be more like 7 and 8-irons instead of 4’s and 5’s. The USGA’s description:

This classic representation of the Redan hole at North Berwick in Scotland features a green that slopes from front right to back left, requiring precise distance control. The prevailing wind is typically against the player and slightly from the right. The back-left bunker will likely catch quite a few tee shots. Players who miss the green long will face a recovery shot back up the slope, and they must be wary of a ball not hit crisply enough rolling back toward them.

Architecturally, the hole is a fun, bizarre little par-3 but other than to one hole location really, shares little in common with the reason people love the original Redan’s playing characteristics.

Here is the video flyover, via the USGA:

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