2018 Ryder Cup: Europeans dominate foursomes, take 5-3 lead

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2018 Ryder Cup: Europeans dominate foursomes, take 5-3 lead

2018 Ryder Cup

2018 Ryder Cup: Europeans dominate foursomes, take 5-3 lead

The Europeans dominated afternoon foursomes at the Ryder Cup, as the home team obliterated the U.S. in a session sweep that put it ahead, 5-3.

Here’s a detailed look at how the Europeans demolished the U.S. on Friday afternoon at Le Golf National:

Henrik Stenson/Justin Rose (Europe) def.
Rickie Fowler/Dustin Johnson (U.S.), 3 and 2

After falling in the morning alongside Jon Rahm, Rose reunited with Stenson to beat the duo of Fowler and Johnson. Rose and Stenson, now 5-2 together in the Ryder Cup and 4-0 on home soil, got off to a slow start, playing their first four holes in 1 over. However, they were all square at that point. Fowler and Johnson continued to struggled, dropping five of the next seven holes. The Europeans made just one birdie during that stretch. Johnson’s putter heated up on the back nine as he won Nos. 12 and 13 with his flatstick, but it wasn’t nearly enough. The Americans played the 16 holes in 3 over.

Rory McIlroy/Ian Poulter (Europe) def.
Bubba Watson/Webb Simpson (U.S.), 4 and 2

After not making a birdie in the morning session, McIlroy found something alongside Poulter, who is now 5-1 in foursomes. The Americans got off to a strong start with wins at Nos. 1 and 3 to go 2 up. But McIlroy hit a nice drive at the par-4 sixth and then made the birdie putt to win the first of four straight holes for his side. Simpson made a short birdie after a nice Watson tee ball at the par-3 11th, but the Europeans responded with wins at Nos. 12 and 13. The win at 13th came after Poulter nearly drove it in the water. McIlroy pulled off a clutch shot from the hazard and Poulter sank a long birdie putt to take a commanding 3-up lead with five to play. Poulter and McIlroy closed things out at the par-3 16th after the Americans conceded a 15-foot birdie putt.

Alex Noren/Sergio Garcia (Europe) def.
Bryson DeChambeau/Phil Mickelson (U.S.), 5 and 4

Hoo boy, where do we even start with this one? One team played really well and the other played really poorly. There we go. OK, we’ll go a little deeper. DeChambeau and Mickelson were overmatched from the start. After a halve at the opening hole, Garcia and Noren thrashed. They won the second and third holes for an early 2-up lead and went further on a tear by winning five straight holes from Nos. 5-9 to rocket the lead to an astounding 7 up at the turn. By that time, the European duo had carded five birdies (although one was conceded). So they were playing tremendously, but the American duo did play the nine in a horrific 4 over. Garcia and Noren seemed to lay off the gas pedal a bit to start the back nine, as they posted back-to-back bogeys to lose Nos. 10 and 11 to fall to 5 up. But Mickelson and DeChambeau fumbled to a bogey at the 12th, which allowed the European duo to restore its margin to six after a par at this same hole. They closed it out two holes later. This was just a straight shellacking, nothing else to it. This Garcia/Noren team is formidable, while DeChambeau/Mickelson should probably be disbanded.

Francesco Molinari/Tommy Fleetwood (Europe) def. Justin Thomas/Jordan Spieth (U.S.), 5 and 4

This one was always steadily in Europe’s favor. The Europeans won Nos. 3, 5 and 6 to take a 3-up lead early. While the Americans cut it to two after the eighth, a sloppy bogey at the ninth pushed them three behind and another bad bogey at the 10th put them 4 down. They never got closer than three the rest of the way. Spieth struggled with his putter in this match while the Europeans were steady on the greens. It may’ve been more subtle, but this one was a dismantling as well.

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