Looking back at Phil vs. Tiger: The great, good, bad and ugly

LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 23: Phil Mickelson celebrates with his caddie and brother Tim during The Match: Tiger vs Phil at Shadow Creek Golf Course on November 23, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images for The Match) Christian Petersen/Getty Images

Looking back at Phil vs. Tiger: The great, good, bad and ugly

Golf on TV

Looking back at Phil vs. Tiger: The great, good, bad and ugly

Phil Mickelson beat Tiger Woods and took home the $9 million winner-take-all prize in their “pay-per-view” match at Shadow Creek in Las Vegas on Friday during this past Thanksgiving weekend.

Here’s a breakdown of the great, the good, the bad and the ugly from Mickelson’s victory. It came on the 22nd hole.

LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 23: Commentators Samuel L. Jackson and Charles Barkley look on prior to The Match: Tiger vs Phil at Shadow Creek Golf Course on November 23, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images for The Match)

Charles Barkley was a highpoint of the Turner Sports telecast of The Match. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

The Great

Charles Barkley: He should have been on the full broadcast, in hindsight. He got right to the point as Tiger and Phil struggled horribly to read Shadow Creek’s greens. He jousted as only he can with Justin Verlander’s Tweets, too. But sadly, Barkley also was not around for the last couple of hours to put a bow.

The Audio: Turns out, a feed of just open microphones would have been enough for most people. Phil was in hard sell mode early but once he settled into a normal round of golf, basically narrated the proceedings. Tiger chimed in with enough to make a player-only feed functional had that been an option.

Yes, Phil was winded at times and a breather was distracting, but the real potential for this production came together as both players had driven beautifully down the 6th, the cameras were tight to both players as we could hear each in between clubs for the approach. The kind of gripping cinematic moment that the organizers had envisioned.

ShotLink Putt Probables: A simple graphic told us how far the player was from the hole and his career make percentage (ShotLink era) from that distance. Simple, clean and informative.

LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 23: Tiger Woods plays his second shot on the second hole during The Match: Tiger vs Phil at Shadow Creek Golf Course on November 23, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images for The Match)

Tiger Woods was very generous in his match against Phil Mickelson. (Harry How/Getty Images)

The Good

Live Drone Shot Down The First Fairway: It was pretty cool to move from one last player interview to a live shot down the first fairway. Unfortunately, the technology appeared limited from there on out. Perhaps too many competing cell signals?

Pat Perez: He sounded engaged and as someone who knew the players, through in a few opinionated remarks about being surprised that Tiger was giving putts and at how they were orchestrating the charity-driven side bets. And not one F-bomb!

Hole Graphics: Animated hole graphics with tracer technology may have been the most vibrant and eye-catching I’ve seen. Once it was clear the drone was not reliable and the drone flyovers were needed, these jumped out as adding a futuristic feel to the telecast.

Tiger Woods’ Generosity: Wow was that many giving putts! But they all helped in the interest of pace of play and entertainment value of the match. This is a nice way of saying he twice prevented (possibly) having The Match end on a missed putt. Phil returned the favor once, by my count.

Phil Mickelson Wearing A Mic – He should be in the great category, but the hard sell mode a few times (“How great is this?” “How great was Samuel Jackson?”) dings the performance a bit. I love how he went off topic with the PGA Tour’s Mark Russell, with brother Tim Mickelson and with others. That’s about how Phil plays a normal round of golf and he gave a window into the types of conversations he has. If only…

Phil Mickelson was just a little to large for the winner’s belt. (Harry How/Getty Images)

The Bad

Announcers Talking Over Players: Everyone was guilty at some point and I’m sympathetic to the cause as this was not a normal broadcast crew, not a normal match and an unprecedented amount of sound for a sporting event to take in.

Still, to miss out on Mickelson asking Russell about a rule of golf change he just does not comprehend and several other side chats about shots, was tough for the core golf fan. The more novice viewer may prefer announcer storytelling, which is why lead announcer Ernie Johnson trampled over so much talk.

The Champion’s Belt: Sensational buckle design, simple brown leather look but uh, it didn’t fit Phil Mickelson, who looked visibly annoyed he couldn’t put it on. Next time, let’s make two belts, one for those with subcutaneous fat and one for those without.

Ernie Johnson: As Phil Mickelson is looking through his rangefinder for a yardage, Ernie Johnson is telling us on the 18th hole that Phil “has the laser out.” Somewhere Frank Chirkinian was screaming. Unfortunately, Johnson regularly spoke over on-course conversations, stated the obvious (what we saw on screen) and did not embellish the action. He would have been better served by having his Inside the NBA counterpart Charles Barkley in the booth, perhaps.

Natalie Gulbis: She appeared for some first hole observations and surfaced again at the 18th tee for a bad interview after Tiger’s chip-in. Her absence in between was not missed.

LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 23: Tiger Woods and caddie Joe LaCava react after Woods lost to Phil Mickelson during The Match: Tiger vs Phil at Shadow Creek Golf Course on November 23, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images for The Match)

The playoff hole did not do any favors for Tiger Woods or Phil Mickelson. (Harry How/Getty Images)

The Ugly

The Playoff Hole: A wise move by promoters to be ready for a tight match and sudden death, the 93 yard shot required a hole location change and had a strange feel to it given the amount of money at stake.

Capital One Ads: Presented in Playing Through mode as we saw golfers walking off the tee, we missed out on match discussions to be annoyed by Samuel Jackson and Charles Barkley asking what’s in our wallet. Better than Capital One cafe spots, but still pretty annoying commercials given that some of us paid for the match.

Gambling: All of the stakeholders learned a valuable lesson: Golf is tricky to bet on and real-time gambling is even trickier. While Mark Broadie supplied some stats that were of note.

But the whirlwind nature of a two-man golf match—yes it moved amazingly fast—made it hard to embed bets or betting scenarios to enjoy.

The most interesting pointed out may have been at the 7th tee when we learned the great 5-1 price gamblers got on the match being even after nine, was in play. Otherwise, the action moved too fast for fun gaming.

Shadow Creek: The course lived up to its name, serving up shadows while the late light hit the treetops. This created an unimpressive look to a course once ranked in Golf Digest’s top ten in the U.S. Add on the excess of flint stone rocks, strategically-light design and tree overplanting, and Shadow Creek did not pop. The course exuded underwhelming television appeal in part because of the odd lighting situation. The 17th hole was deemed a genuine centerpiece but came off looking like something even waterfall lover Donald Trump would say was sooo last century.

AT&T/Turner/Bleacher Report Synergy: A complete wreck. Seen as the future of sports broadcasting, the inability to conduct normal transactions and ensuing decision to give away a pay-per-view match overshadowed everything. Just about every provider who offered The Match has opted to issue either a refund or a credit. The disastrous rollout of the supposed future of broadcasting and sports packaging provided a stark reminder that the rush to usher in a new era is just that: rushed. Gwk

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