Forecaddie: Looking ahead to the 2024 Ryder Cup at Bethpage Black

Peter Casey-USA TODAY Sports

Forecaddie: Looking ahead to the 2024 Ryder Cup at Bethpage Black

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Forecaddie: Looking ahead to the 2024 Ryder Cup at Bethpage Black

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Now that the PGA Championship circus is heading out of town, the attention from Farmingdale to France turns to September 2024 when the Ryder Cup arrives at Bethpage Black.

“I don’t have to worry about that because I’ll be too old by then I think,” Paul Casey said when asked about the possible setup and atmosphere. Smart man.

Rory McIlroy, who will be 35 in 2024, does not expect the 3-1/2 inch rough to return.

“I think the fans would like to see a few more birdies,” he said after playing his final 45 holes 6-under-par to finish T8. “I would say that for match play, it should be a little more of a generous setup, I would think.”

And the crowds in 2024?

“No comment,” McIlroy said.

One European Tour player who missed the cut said he doesn’t want to be here for 2024, then declared no sane captain would pick him after his performance.

You have to love Eddie Pepperell.

So how will Bethpage work with a Ryder Cup setup? The rough will be down and some of the fairways may get widened. At the pace we’re on, the 1st hole will be a drivable par-4 and hopefully the PGA changes the 7th hole back to a par-5.

The routing presents some issues for moving around quickly, so the Man Out Front won’t be surprised if captains are driving heavy-duty off-road carts around this massive property. As for logistics, the PGA of America will need many more grandstands and concessions on the other side of Round Swamp Road, where most of the golf will be played on holes 2 through 14 and where PGA fans waited in long lines to get a $15 adult beverage.

Then again, the Man Out Front thinks this could be how the PGA solves concerns about adult beverage consumption.

As for the fans and how they’ll treat the players?

Loud cheers and jeers for Brooks Koepka and Dustin Johnson down the stretch Sunday after hitting bad shots earned a scolding from the CBS announcers, but that may only be an appetizer for the anticipated zaniness in 2024.

Asked after winning the PGA what he thought the Ryder Cup will be like at Bethpage, Koepka smiled and paused.

“We’ve actually talked about this a lot during the week,” he said. “It was – good luck to Europe with the fans.”

The U.S. captain in 2024 — presumably Phil Mickelson — will need to give several speeches asking for a little restraint. But not too much, since you wouldn’t want the Long Islanders to completely change their ways.

After all, what would be the point of nullifying the home course advantage?


   

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