Patrick Reed snaps his wedge over his knee at U.S. Open

Orlando Ramirez/USA TODAY Sports

Patrick Reed snaps his wedge over his knee at U.S. Open

USGA

Patrick Reed snaps his wedge over his knee at U.S. Open

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PEBBLE BEACH – The 18th hole strikes again, as Patrick Reed had a frustrating finishing hole on Friday.

After a 280-yard drive off the right, his second went into the fairway bunker on the left.

His third shot to the par 5 hole went over the green.

He fourth shot coming back went back across the green and in the rough.

His barely advanced his fifth shot at all, with his ball still in the rough.

That’s when he got all weekend hacker, as he took his wedge in both hands and snapped the shaft over his leg.

He then tossed both pieces on the ground next to his bag and grabbed another club.

 

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After finally chipping on with his sixth shot, Reed needed to make a 3-footer for double bogey to finish at 2-over, right on the cutline for the weekend.

He then he made that putt for a 7, ending his round.

Reed then took off his hat to shake hands with his playing partners before leaving the 18th green.

Later in the day, Golf Channel’s Will Gray Tweeted:

Spoke to Reed, who was delightfully unapologetic about the club snap. Said he didn’t swear, didn’t damage the golf course and got his anger out. “To me, it’s no big deal…it was comical after watching it afterwards.”

Kessler Karain walks with a wedge broken by Patrick Reed on the 18th green during the second round of the 2019 U.S. Open. Photo: Michael Madrid/USA TODAY Sports

If you were wondering about the rules regarding replacing broken clubs, the USGA’s website explains it like this:

New Rule: Under Rule 4.1

  • A player is allowed to keep using and/or to repair any club damaged during the round, no matter what the damage and even if the player damaged it in anger.
  • A player is not allowed to replace a damaged club, except when it is damaged during the round by an outside influence or natural forces or by someone other than the player or his or her caddie.

Seeing as how that was Reed’s last hole of the day, nothing was really affected.

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The 18th was also not much fun for Lucas Bjerregaard, who on Thursday posted an 11 on the 18th hole.

It was the second highest score on the 18th hole in a U.S. Open.

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