Giving advice on the golf course? You won't see it 'thousands of times'

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Giving advice on the golf course? You won't see it 'thousands of times'

LPGA Tour

Giving advice on the golf course? You won't see it 'thousands of times'

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The latest Rules of Golf incident isn’t going away any time soon it appears.

Kendall Dye and Dewi Weber were both handed two-stroke penalties after Dye motioned toward Weber’s caddie to ask about a club choice during Round 6 of LPGA Q-Series last week at Pinehurst.

Dye and Jacqueline Schram, Weber’s caddie, said they didn’t know signaling for a club was against the rules, while Weber was unaware the violation took place.

Christina Kim, the player who witnessed and reported the violation, was criticized by some and responded Sunday morning on Golf Channel. Her TV appearance drew a response from Dye on Twitter, who called out Kim for being “unprofessional” and wrote she has seen this situation play out “thousands of times” in her 10 years as a professional.

Queue more criticism.

Monday morning on Golf Channel’s Morning Drive, Robert Damron shot down Dye’s “thousands of times” assertion.

“The fact that she’s said she’s seen this thousands of times is a crazy statement,” said Damron, adding he’s never seen it happen once on a professional level. Maybe at a club, sure. “I think that she’s confusing the fact that a caddie may flash a number to a spotter or a cameraman or one of the on-course reporters what they’re hitting, but it’s no way directed at the other players. No way did one of the other players ask them, ‘Tell me what you just hit there.’”

Damron didn’t stop there.

“Kendall says she’s been a pro for 10 years. Not knowing this rule… this isn’t one that’s buried in the rule book.”

Golfweek’s Geoff Shackelford was also on set Monday morning and agreed.

“Ultimately it really does come down to a really simple thing: This is not something that has happened thousands of times,” explained Shackelford, who wrote a column addressing the topic. “We’ve all enjoyed the fun of watching a player go over and look in (another player’s) bag and see what was hit. To simply ask, what’s next … are you going to ask for help for a read on a putt? That’s why the rule’s in place.”

It wasn’t all criticism, though. Golf Channel’s Lisa Cornwell came to Dye’s defense on Twitter, echoing Damron’s claim she might be confusing the issue.

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